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Folk Lore associated with Persimmon seeds


A Persimmon fruit has many seeds inside.
Upon cracking them open, you will find any one of the three pieces of “silverware” shapes.
KNIFE: you’ll slice through winter (mild)
SPOON: you’ll need to spoon out the snow (moderate)…
FORK: you’ll have to “dig in” (severe)…so —
…whichever you find the most of, within the seeds, is the winter prediction.

very interesting, now I need to decide if it is a knife or spoon?
The first one we opened a few weeks ago looked like a knife.
Fun reading about the folk lore.
Have a good autumn everyone!

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That sounds like good fun. Amazing though. I have never heard about this folk lore, so I learned something again.

11 Oct, 2008


That's very interesting Ediegirl. I love hearing and reading about folklore. We have lots here in Wales.

11 Oct, 2008


Fascinating stuff, and, aren't those shapes just like the real things?

11 Oct, 2008


I'm always learning new things and enjoy every minute of it, whether it be bugs,plants or trees.

11 Oct, 2008


My grandmother always told me about this and now my mother does. But surf the web, there are many versions. We have always heard of other meanings for the flatware. I am sure over the years that the means have been forgotten and reinvented. Ours-
Knife-wind will cut right though you- (very cold icy)
Fork-mild and raking would be needed (mild fall like)
Spoon-shoveling and digging out (heavy snow fall)
Don't forget the Persimmon Pie. A Missouri favorite.

22 Nov, 2008


Hi Myturn,
I have been reading alot about it in the newpapers and the Missouri Conservation site. It is very interesting. I have
only lived here since 2006 and find this part of the country very different and enjoy the spring and summers. I'm sure hoping our winter is mild.

22 Nov, 2008


Hey Ediegirl,
We just got back from a family reunion at Wildwood. We always crack persimmon seeds this time of year to see what Winter is going to be like. We cracked ten in a row and they all came out SPOONS.
In our family, Spoons mean: a lot of snow - cold wet Winter. Some of the old timers call the spoon a scoop shovel because you'll be shoveling a lot of snow before spring.
Forks mean: It's going to be a cold, dry Winter, drought conditions, like pitching dry hay.
Knife means: December will be so foggy that you'll have to cut through it with a knife, then in January the cold winds will cut through you like a knife.

27 Sep, 2009

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