The Garden Community for Garden Lovers

You can visit our Schefflera actinophylla page or browse the pictures using the next and previous links.

Schefflera actinophylla - Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree Flowering


Schefflera actinophylla - Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree Flowering (Schefflera actinophylla - Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree)

Umbrella tree is very commonly grown in Southern California. This tree on Coronado Island is just starting to bloom...most in my neighborhood have been blooming for the last 3 weeks or so now. This tree can grow to become a very tall tree to 60+ feet/ 19+ meters. Photo taken Oct. 8, 2010.



Comments on this photo

 

oh, huge...
again - love it as a housplant... tricky with the maintenance, but as soon as you know how much water it likes - fantastic to have indoors, lol
just noticed the purple stems - are they flowers?

9 Oct, 2010

 

Okasia:

Yes, virtually all the umbrella trees are blooming here now.

9 Oct, 2010

 

We used to have a number of these in Phoenix--in sheltered spots, of course--but the summers started getting too hot for them. We've lost a number of species from our plant palette that way.

11 Oct, 2010

 

Tugbrethil:

I can under how this tree would burn easily in Phoenix. It loves heat...but, that extreme 'blast inferno' heat is too much! lol! : > )

11 Oct, 2010

 

It seems to be the hotter nights that have made the difference. We've always had to keep them on the east side of something.

11 Oct, 2010

 

Tugbrethil:

I would've guessed the very hot, dry air would burn them.

11 Oct, 2010

 

No, they usually act like they are getting root rot, but the standard root rot treatments don't stop the wilting. Increasing the humidity just makes it worse.

12 Oct, 2010

 

Tugbrethil:

Wow! That sounds very strange.

12 Oct, 2010

 

Happens to a lot of not-quite-heat-tolerant plants here: Aeoniums, Crassulas, Mandevillea hybrids, Calandrinia, Lewisia cotyledon, Coast Rosemary, Jasminum mesnyi, etc. It gets pretty annoying, sometimes, not being able to grow what worked 10 years ago!

12 Oct, 2010

 

Tugbrethil:

It seems like it may be a combination of heat and soil conditions.

Does Adenium grow well there? It's truly a desert plant which would tolerate very hot temps without burning. It is however, a tender shrub.

12 Oct, 2010

 

Delonix:

The soils are quite variable here in the Valley of the Sun: everything from decomposed granite, to river sand, to "adobe" clay. The wrong kind of plant will go downhill even potted in cactus mix!

Adenium does great in the summer, here, but we have to bring it in most winters. It can burn out in full sun, but that is usually when watering is forgotten, or if it's not hardened off.

12 Oct, 2010

 

Tugbrethil:

That's very strange it would burn in Phoenix and not in the extremely hot tropical deserts of African, where it's native. Maybe it has to do with the type of soil? or maybe ground water?

13 Oct, 2010

 

British documentaries often rant about how hot it is in Africa, and most are impressed...until you translate the temps quoted into Farenheit. They usually turn out to be less than 100 deg.! Except for the more extreme parts of the Namib, or the Sahara, Africa is not so hot.

As for the soil type, it doesn't matter much, except that those in heavy soil go down faster than those in light soil. And our water table is more than 100 ft down, except right next to the stingy, short, still flowing portion of the Salt River. The water table wouldn't affect those in pots, anyway.

My own theory is that some of the cellular enzymes just fail to work once the daily average temps go above a certain point. Point in case, African Acacia enzymes average most efficient at 95 deg. F, while Blue Spruce enzymes are most efficient at 55 deg. I don't know if anyone has measured Schefflera enzymes, but in my experience, the whole aralia family is a little wimpy as to heat tolerance--Sceffleras used to be one of the best!

13 Oct, 2010

 

It's odd you say that about Africa.
I've been to various parts of north, east and west Africa, at various times of the year, and the temperatures i've experienced have definately exceeded 100 degrees, every time.

13 Oct, 2010

 

Tugbrethil:

I do know the Arizona and California deserts are some of the hottest in the world. I guess it does make sense.

I'm sure you're correct about the cellular enzymes failing under the high temps in Phoenix. I do know many plants will stop growing above a certain temp...just like below a certain temp. Most Bananas, for example usually stop growing above 100F. I think Schefflera species are used to high temps to 95F with high humidity...of course, which makes the heat index much, much hotter to humans.

I'm so glad even in inland San Diego, we don't have to be concerned with the extremely high temps you get in Phoenix. The worst heat I've had to endure in San Diego was in July 22, 2006 (I remember the day well) it was 109 degrees F. with 40% humidity...which calculated to a heat index of: 132 degrees F.! It was absolutely HORRIBLE!!!

13 Oct, 2010

 

Louise1:

Was the actual temp. above 100F. or was the heat index above 100F.?

13 Oct, 2010

 

I'm afraid i'm ignorant to the technical terms guys but i can say that the thermometer readings (taken in shade about 20' away from accomodations) were between ranges of 110 to 140 degrees.
The east coast had less humidity, the west more so, the north i'd say was between the two.

13 Oct, 2010

 

Louise1:

It sounds like actual temperature. However, I would be incredulous about the 140 degree F. temp. The two hottest official temperatures ever recorded on Earth was in: Death Valley, California at 134 degrees F./ 57 degrees C. and El Azizia, Libya, Africa at 136 degrees F. / 58 degrees C.

13 Oct, 2010

 

Those levels of heat have a very soporific effect on the body - at least that's how 'i' found them, absolutely stiffling and i can take quite a bit of heat.
When humidity is added to that factor it alters it completely - for the worst.

13 Oct, 2010

 

Thinking about it ...... i've experienced very similar high temps all along the equator right across to Indonesia, although the humidity spoilt everything the further east you went.

13 Oct, 2010

 

Isn't the centre of Australia the hottest place on earth ?

13 Oct, 2010

 

Louise1:

Yes, I agree those levels of heat can really stress the body.

When ever we have excessive heat here in inland San Diego or California. Excessive heat warnings are issued by the National Weather Service. This generally happens when the temperature and humidity are high, therefore increasing the heat index.

I actually think that Death Valley (desert) and parts of the Sahara desert and Middle East are considered the hottest places on earth. However, I would assume if you calculate heat index into the equation there may be a lot more places added.

I

15 Oct, 2010

 

Aussies like to say the outback is hottest just as they say Eucalyptus regnans is the tallest species of tree in the world.
Wrong!

30 Sep, 2014

 

I'm sure it does get hot in the outback; however, the heat of the Southwest is just crazy HOT!

I think E. regnans rivals the giant coastal redwood tree, though.

2 Oct, 2014



Comment on this photo


   Photo 3 of 10

  • previous slideshow photo
  • next slideshow photo

What else?

See who else is growing Schefflera actinophylla - Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree.

See who else has plants in genus Schefflera.

Members who like this photo

  • Gardening with friends since
    9 Apr, 2008

  • Gardening with friends since
    24 Nov, 2009

  • Gardening with friends since
    14 Aug, 2008

  • Gardening with friends since
    27 Feb, 2009

  • Gardening with friends since
    9 Aug, 2009