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'Messy' areas.

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I suspect that visitors to my garden politely ignored the messy areas at each side of the old apple tree in the far corner. I tended to avert my eyes, too!

When Mark built ‘The Great Wall of Somerset’, he needed to have access to the back of the wall so he went across the messy area to the right of the (very) old tree. It’s so old that it’s propped up on a small wall.

I wrote a blog about this area last autumn – after I’d finished refurbishing it. Remember what it looked like?

It’s filled out a lot since then – this photo was taken earlier this month.

BUT – the pleasing new planting just showed up the contrast between this and the other side of the apple tree.

I took that photo just after I started sorting the mess out – I had started ripping ivy off the small wall. I had a lot more to get out, plus various other weeds and even a 3ft tall ash sapling! Removing the weeds wasn’t the most difficult part, though – under everything I found tough weed membrane. I had to use a stanley knife to cut pieces and heave them out. It took ages!

Eventually I managed it, and raked the rest over. At least it looked tidier like that.

Unfortunately, the soil under the membrane was thoroughly compacted, and the area had stayed unplanted for over 30 years. It was almost too much for me – to dig out rocks, stones and pieces of tile and crockery, so I took my time over it. I filled the barrow three times with them.

The level of the soil was well below the wall, so as we’d used up all our home-made compost and the next lot wasn’t ready to use, we went off and bought three large bales of multi-purpose which I pepped up with a barrow of leafmould and a good sprinkling of chicken manure pellets.

I wanted the new planting to ‘echo’ the bed at the other side of the tree, so I chose Geranium phaeum ‘Lily Lovell’, and a Pulmonaria ’Blake’s Silver’ as a start.

P. ’Blake’s Silver’

I’d rescued two Tiarella cordifolia from the pear tree area, and they’re perfect for shady corners. I also split a plant of Carex ‘Ice Dance’ and added that. I’ve potted up some Geranium macrorrhizum as well – that’s great in shade. I’ll plant that when it’s rooted well.

It looks a bit sparse at the moment, but so did the other side when I first planted that up!

It’s a ‘work in progress’ at the moment, but it’s not an eye-sore any longer.

Polygonatum commutatum

Now which area do I need to work on next?

More blog posts by spritzhenry

Previous post: More problems after the flood.

Next post: An up-date on 'The Great Wall'



Comments

 

Well done Barbara - that did sound like hard work! I hope it wasn't too much for you, but am encouraged that you managed it . . . It's going to look very pretty, and things will soon fill out as the weather warms up (as it must soon :))

29 Apr, 2013

 

What a difference Barbara looking great now.

29 Apr, 2013

 

Well done indeed! It looks fantastic already! I know which area I need to work on B....my fence...all around it....couch grass is invading my garden! I need to get out there with the glyphosphate and a lot of poly bags! Not a pleasant job :( but has to be done, or in no time I will have a field of grass and all else will be choked!

29 Apr, 2013

 

Great work, must be very satisfying to see the results of all the hard labour, and it'll soon fill out and look wonderful like the other side.

29 Apr, 2013

 

Thank you - yes, it is satisfying even though it's half empty still. I was pleased that I managed all the hard part! I couldn't have done it even just a few weeks ago, but my stamina is coming back. :-)))

Karen - couch grass really is a menace. I don't envy you!

30 Apr, 2013

 

Gosh such a transformation Spritz!
Such hard work but worth it for the result x

30 Apr, 2013

 

I was quite ashamed of that area, Pam, so I'm pleased I tackled it! :-)

30 Apr, 2013

 

Its fiiled up lovely Spritz and the second side will soon be the same, it does look and sound like hard work and so good to know you are now fit enough to accomplish these tasks yourself, well done and now back to enjoying the lighter side of your lovely garden tasks, for a while anyway........

30 Apr, 2013

 

Love the border doesn't take long for plants to cover does it? I can't do anything like that now I have a man who comes and does the digging etc. I love 'pottering' though :0)

30 Apr, 2013

 

I'm very grateful that the surgeons 'mended' me, Skilla. I couldn't have done all this work before or in the months after my op. Now I can! :-)

30 Apr, 2013

 

You really never fail to amaze me Spritz. I can't get over how the other side filled up some quickly.
It won't be long until it all fills out and you will think it's always been there.

30 Apr, 2013

 

We all have areas that we know need sorting, and it is so rewarding when we can do most of it ourselves, a big pat on the back is needed I feel, the other side is a picture, has grown so much in a short space of time, so it will not be long before the new side fills out, I think a rest is needed before you find another area to work on!! well done Barbara.

30 Apr, 2013

 

Thank you both - that's very kind. :-)

Hmmmm... behind the summer house is awful - a real mess. lol.

1 May, 2013

 

You've worked so hard - I'm exhausted just reading about it! You've chosen some nice plants for your new area and the hellebores are looking great on the other side. I want to dismantle a shed but not sure I can tackle it alone and OH has too much on to lend a hand at the moment. Trouble is, I'm impatient and impulsive, so I foresee a mess in the making...

1 May, 2013

 

Looking great. The Hellebore in pic 2 caught my eye as am thinking of buying some later in the year and you reminded me. What is the grass to the left in pic 2, a Carex?

1 May, 2013

 

Hi Spitz, Been missing for a while, but lovely reading your blog and catching up. My OH had a stroke on Easter Tuesday so suddenly my world is trying to keep up on the garden in the early morning then rushing to the hospital to help feed him and keep him calm home to do his washing and drying and back for evenig visiting but I now know how you managed the updates on your flood disaster, as Goy is a real consoler when you can't sleep in the nights, get up, a cuppa and and hour on the Goy and back to bed does seem to relax me. I keep thinking of your lovely garden under water and am wondering how the overall effect is now that Spring is at last raising its head. I had started to rejuvenate my arbour, and paths to make it easier for us both in the future, thankfully the heavy work was well on the way before Easter in spite of the weather, so the cement mixing and pointing I have been doing early morning before the phone and the callers start. The housewok fits in somewhere inbetween I don't quite know when but all in hand at the moment. As you have said before, It is wonderful where you get the strength from when needed. I have been trying to cut down on the grass paths, making the beds larger as the dutch hoe can work quite easy but the lawn mower in difficult places is hard. Hubby always did all the lawns, all 5 are much larger than most folks grass areas, yet not suitable for a ride on. Keeping busy is my answer to everything and I can see from your blog we are one of a kind. Oh and the garden is so rewarding.

2 May, 2013

 

I'm so sorry to hear that, Telme - keep strong. You asked what the overall effect of the flood was - well, it finished off my 'Meditteranean' plants like the lavenders and cistus, and the dianthus as well.

The other nasty effect is on-going...take a look at the Himalayan Balsam blog I wrote - they're still appearing.:-(

Kildermorie, no it's a Liriope! I think its called 'Silver Dragon'.

2 May, 2013

 

the area is looking good spritz. you asked where next? can I suggest the outskirts of Beverely :o)).

3 May, 2013

 

Remembering back to your blog last year this is looking real good its amazing how quickly the gaps between the planting has filled up, so after the hard work on your new area I`ve no doubt it will be looking as good in next to no time.

3 May, 2013

 

I hope so, Stroller. I've added some ferns and Euphorbia amygaloides, plus a Smilacina and an Aruncus since I wrote the blog, so there's not much space left now. :-)

I know the Euphorbia is a thug, but it's right at the back and I hope it might spread backwards under the last remaining Leylandii tree. It would make a dull area look 'cared for'. I spoke to the Euphorbia about it, but it wasn't listening...lol. We shall see!

4 May, 2013

 

Seaburn, I'd love to come up with my trusty trowel... but why do you live so far away? How about a move to the West Country? :-D)

4 May, 2013

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