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Galanthus nivalis or common Snowdrop

39 comments


I have just asked for I.D. on the Snowdrops in my garden … they were inherited when we bought the house nine years ago and flowered annually in the front garden. I planned ahead of the make-over and re-sited them to the back garden … hoping they would take to being moved from a sunny South garden to a shady part in the North one!

They haven’t disappointed … little groups of them are popping up now. I have to admit I’ve never really looked closely at a Snowdrop … just took them for granted!

I hope you’ll agree with me that they are a beautiful little flower. I came across the following words about Snowdrops today . . . .

I like to think that, long ago, there fell to Earth some flakes of snow which loved this cold, grey world of ours so much, they stayed as Snowdrop flowers.

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Comments

 

they really are quite stunning when you see them close up as you have done here,

5 Feb, 2011

 

Thanks, Yorkshire, I'm not sure what's gone wrong with the last pic, the camera probably didn't like the wind and rain today! : o ((

5 Feb, 2011

 

just gorgeous ~ thanks shirley ~ i put a picture of mine on today ~ i think the eidelweiss song should be about snowdrops not eidelweiss
i loved that poem.

5 Feb, 2011

 

Lovely Shirley - as you say, worth looking at closely.

5 Feb, 2011

 

I never really noticed how lovely they were until we started going to Cambo snowdrop walk every spring. They have a snowdrop art exhibition and snowdrop gift shop etc. and you really get to see them up close. Also, they put a bunch on each table, in the cafe, in a little vase and that way you get to sniff them too. They have a lovely scent which you never normally get when they are right down on the ground. I agree Shirley, they are lovely. I like the 'ordinary' ones best, but they are all lovely and the freshness of the bright green and the pure white is just so 'clean' and fresh. Lovely!

5 Feb, 2011

 

They are simply beautiful and to look inside one is simply a marvel to behold!

5 Feb, 2011

 

They look lovely Shirley, it's quite possible you are sitting on a small fortune, the one's with green in them are worth money. I'm sure I read recently that someone paid £500 for a "green snowdrop".

5 Feb, 2011

 

Shirley, just went to questions, did'nt see that before I wrote above. :o))

5 Feb, 2011

 

Ha ha, Littlelegs, don't you think there's something very obscene about paying hundreds of pounds for a single Snowdrop when the world is in the state it is? Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox now! : o )

5 Feb, 2011

 

Yes, nearly as obscene as footballer's wages! lol

5 Feb, 2011

 

Indeed, OH tells me that a player recently transferred from Spain to Stoke and forgot he'd left his Ferrari in a station car park in Spain! Beggars belief really!

5 Feb, 2011

 

your right they are so pretty close up shirley, even not close-up really especially when alot :o)

5 Feb, 2011

 

San, I've just been looking at the NGS site and there's a list of gardens open tomorrow, across the nation, for Snowdrop walks. Now, I wonder if OH fancies a drive out tomorrow afternoon ... lol! : o )

5 Feb, 2011

 

lol shirley, i will check it out, we went to lytham hall last year, not sure they will be out yet here though, thanx :o)
good luck shirley lol

5 Feb, 2011

 

Really pretty ,Shirley.Mine are just starting to show,although I haven't many..I agree about obscene amounts paid for things too..I saw an American girl on TV paying $4000 for liposuction on her thighs..when you think about starving people who haven't an ounce of fat on them...sickening...anyway,on a lighter note,I hope the weather is good enough for a drive for you ,tomorrow..:o)

5 Feb, 2011

 

i heard about a place called 'Dial Park' in worcestershire which is open 20th and 23rd february for a snowdrop and hellebore walk, looks really nice; i think they have their own web site.

5 Feb, 2011

 

oh wow they are lovely mine are now up I only have a little bunch do they make if left? I am hopeing but if not I will have to get some more:)

6 Feb, 2011

 

Don't know much about snowdrops but this might be 'Sam Arnott'. Would be worth a pm to anothergalanthophile?

6 Feb, 2011

 

Lovely snowdrops shirley... i have the ones with the green on coming up.... not sure of there name though... i bought them last year.. will see if i kept the label......

6 Feb, 2011

 

Holly .. I've just sent a PM to 'another...' as suggested by Wagger .. I'm interested to know the variety now!

6 Feb, 2011

 

nice new avatar shirley

6 Feb, 2011

 

There are lots of different types. I've never really noticed myself either. I think they are beautiful

6 Feb, 2011

 

Sticki ... those are my Daffs in the garden! Yellow cheers meup right now. : o )))
They're a lovely little flower, Hywel, I see you have some too ... hooray! : o ))

6 Feb, 2011

 

just a few. But there's lots in my mother's garden that I'm going to fetch soon.

6 Feb, 2011

 

I moved mine just after they'd finished flowering ... they didn't seem to mind the move! : o )

6 Feb, 2011

 

That's good.
I have to move them now. The contracts will be ready to sign in a week or 2, so there's no time to wait till flowering is over.

6 Feb, 2011

 

Oh, I see, so if you pot them up at your Mums place, you could then plunge the pots in the soil in your garden for a good display! Bet your Mum would be pleased to know her Snowdrops will become yours. :o ))

6 Feb, 2011

 

My mother never went down the garden except to peg clothes out lol. But her friend who lived on a farm gave her the snowdrops. I suppose she'd be pleased I'm taking them.

6 Feb, 2011

 

Yes, I forgot your Mum wasn't a gardener! : o )

6 Feb, 2011

 

So so beautiful, love them!

7 Feb, 2011

 

Do you think it's because they're one of the first Spring flowers? It makes us think of more to come after the awful Winter. : o )

7 Feb, 2011

 

Think you might be right there Shirley tulip - it does give you a good feeling seeing the little white snowdrops how they push up through the cold ground and survive is amazing, especially after all the hard frosts we have had.

7 Feb, 2011

 

your daffodils out already shirley?

7 Feb, 2011

 

Sticki ... just the one bunch are in flower ... I posted a pic at the weekend ... Yorkshire is not amused! : o ))

8 Feb, 2011

 

i must have seen those and forgotten ~ oh dear ~ oh to have a memory!
no yorkshire would not be pleased but she does live in the far north ~ they have other benefits!

8 Feb, 2011

 

Cant find the label for mine.... have you found out what it is yet...

8 Feb, 2011

 

Holly ... waiting on a reply from a PM for the I.D. ... : o )

8 Feb, 2011

 

Hi, the chances are you have nivalis or elwesii. These can be very variable which is why there are so many named forms but these can occur in ordinary gardens. Have a look at www.judyssnowdrops.co.uk and www.snowdropinfo.com for some great pictures of snowdrop varieties.
The main things to look at when trying to identify snowdrops are the way the leaves are arranged and their shape and colour (Grey-green, Green or Bluish-grey) and the pattern and extent of the green markings on the inner parts of the flower.
Leaves can emerge from the bulb with the two leaves flattish, facing each other and be the same size (applanate) - our common snowdrop (G. nivalis) is like this. A slightly different leaf form sees the margins of the leaf narrowly tucked under (explicate) - this type is shown by G. plicatus.
The other main type has one leaf base wrapping round the other (supervolute) - plants with bluish-grey leaves are likely to be Galanthus elwesii, those with glossy bright green leaves are likely to be G. woronowii (often mislabelled ikariae in garden centres).
Many of the bigger, stronger growing garden forms are actually hybrids, usually of G. nivalis with G.plicatus - they have broader leaves than nivalis (wider than a little finger-nail) and you can see that one or more of the leaf margins shows the narrowly folded over edge shown by plicatus. The more garden worthy double forms known as the Greatorex hybrids are of this parentage.
G. nivalis and most of the commonly grown species have a single green mark at the end of the inner flower segments but G. elwesii typically has two discrete green patches - one at the top, one at the bottom - although in a lot of plants these two merge together and many plants of G. elwesii in cultivation only have a single apical green patch - they can be told from nivalis (and plicatus) by their leaf arrangement.

Identifying named cultivars, of which there are hundreds is not easy - some are very distinctive because they show strikingly abnormal flowers but many differ in only small subtle ways.

I have many snowdrops that are not named but I love them all!

8 Feb, 2011

 

Thankyou so much for this information ... I shall investigate further! : o )

8 Feb, 2011

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