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These Snowdrops were inherited with the house ... please tell me if they are the 'common' type for want of a better term!



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Answers

 

Shirley, snowdrops are all 'common' or else there is no such thing as common, depending on your point of view. I think that these are very nice Galanthus nivalis - not worth £350 each on ebay but I am sure that they make a very nice display.

5 Feb, 2011

 

My word, that was a quick answer, Mr.B. ! 'Common' was probably an unwise choice of word, but I wouldn't sell them for anything, really love Snowdrops. Thanks for the I.D. : o )

5 Feb, 2011

 

Blimey Shirley how many have you got ?you could be a rich woman LOL

5 Feb, 2011

 

LOL, Tulsa! Mine aren't any of the 'collector' variety.

5 Feb, 2011

 

We-- very luckily-- inherited the double ones

5 Feb, 2011

 

Have to confess Pam I much prefer the single to the double.

5 Feb, 2011

 

There are a few hundred varieties, I believe. To me, they're all snowdrops, all beautiful, and the single ones the best, because they're simple. Worthy

6 Feb, 2011

 

These are lovely. Since you asked the q are these the 'common' ones well I am wondering if they are not the ones we see most frequently. They have a spot of green at the base of each inner petal and a v shaped green mark at the end of the petal. I am not so sure that that is galanthus nivalis which is the one you are most likely to be offered if buying snowdrops. With 200+ varieties it will be difficult to say which you have but if you take one to a snowdrop day the gardeners there might be able to be more specific.

6 Feb, 2011

 

the're all lovely-- a friend has a variety that regularly flowers before christmas. The double do fascinate me-- so tiny barely 1/2 inch across and to see the full beauty I pick a few for the house and marvel at the tiny green & white ballerina skirt hidden under the white petals

6 Feb, 2011

 

I have just been looking at Galanthophiles' photos of snowdrops in her garden. To me a snowdrop was a snowdrop, some single and some double. I like snowdrops regardless of which they are but I have had my eyes opened to their finer points since joining Goy and have enjoyed seeing the differences shown in photographs posted by members.

6 Feb, 2011

 

I picked a few of my double ones for the house and have been suprised to find that some have 3 outer long petals-- and some have 4-- on Galanthophiles picture that 'flora plena' had 5 do you think that they are all the same variety?-- I've not actually bought any --just split the clump I inherited

8 Feb, 2011

 

I Dk the answer Pamg but I thought I would share this gem with you all. I have no idea where I picked it up if anyone recognises it please let me know. I think it is a lovely story.

SNOWDROP
A great deal of folklore depends on our calendar, Anyways…..!

When Eve was expelled from Eden, flowers failed to bloom, and she sat there, crying. An Angel caught a tear and breathed on it. It fell to Earth, and became the first Snowdrop. From this, Hope was born.

When God asked the snow to get some colour from all the flowers, all refused, except for the snowdrop, who obliged. hence, this is the first flower of the year.

Monks from Rome originally brought snowdrop bulbs to England. they were grown in the gardens of monasteries, and achieved the name of “church flowers”. In time, their presence in churchyards were seen as unlucky, and they were thrown over the walls, to colonise the countryside.

The Winter Witch fought a duel with Lady Spring, who received a cut to her finger. Where the blood fell, when the snow melted, a snowdrop grew, and so Spring has henceforth always beat Winter.

It is unlucky to bring/grow snowdrops indoors. In some cultures, even the sight of a snowdrop in the garden heralds disaster/death.

8 Feb, 2011

 

I always though it was lilac that shouldn't be brought indoors Scotsgran-- maybe its an English thing---

8 Feb, 2011

 

Here in Scotland it is Ribes (Flowering currant) that we would never bring in because it smells horrible when it is used as a cut flower. I had not heard of Lilac not being brought in. The last paragraph in my post above was part of the article. Incidentally flowers I received at Christmas were really past their best so I decided to bin them today. The petals from the lilies in the bouquet had fully dried out and smell heavenly so I have put them in my pot pourri dish.

8 Feb, 2011

 

they lasted very well 'Gran I threw mine out last week but I had kept them cool!

9 Feb, 2011

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