The Garden Community for Garden Lovers
 

United Kingdom Gb

I have just purchased a new flat with a balcony. At present there are a few 'troughs', which of course look empty at this time of year. I have to admit, I'm not especially good at looking after plants/flowers so I was thinking of putting a few evergreen plants out there because I do like the greenery. Here's my question: - I was in Homebase picking up some bit and pieces for the new place and I saw some Taxus shaped into little 40-50cm high Christmas trees and I got to thinking that they would be ideal, as I've read that they are very hardy and resistant to urban pollution (and my flat is on a main road!)...however, what I wanted to know is -> can Taxus be kept small with regular pruning? If not, are there any other evergreen shrubs that either don't grow too big or can be kept small? I am planning to put some flowers out there when the weather warms up but I'd really like to have a few plants that are green all year round. Thanks :)




Answers

 

Boxus fits your description of what you want, its evergreen can be trimmed to shape and size and will not grow too big.
Heathers are also something you could consider?

19 Nov, 2010

 

also the sall leafed hebes have pretty flowers as well as evergreen foliage.

19 Nov, 2010

 

Also remember some plants like Heathers need Ericasous soil, so check plants soil needs. :o)))

20 Nov, 2010

 

Hello Legostan, wellcome to GOY. This isn't an answer to your question, but there is another GOYer on here, funnily enough called Balcony, you might want to look up some blogs. Hope this helps.

20 Nov, 2010

 

Hello again Legostan and welcome from me also. As you are new you may not have come across Goypeadia yet? Which has lots of ideas that you might like? Try pages like Container ideas, Annuals, Balconies, Evergreens even patio ideas? for lots of pics on how other members have tackled theirs. Just go to the bottom of the page and click on a large letter to take you to the list.
Pieris Japonica and Skimmia might also fit your needs?

20 Nov, 2010

 

I too have a balcony - luckily, mine's south facing, and which way yours faces is crucial - I get sun all year round out there, but if you have a north facing balcony, it will be in shade for 10 months of the year, most likely, and that makes a huge difference to what you can grow there. Do you have any idea which way it faces?

20 Nov, 2010

 

For labor saving tips, look for soil polymer, which can reduce the frequency of watering needed; or timed release fertilizers, which reduce the frequency of your feeding schedule. Otherwise, container plants always need more frequent watering and feeding than plants in the ground. Youmight also consider the fact that containers should have drainage holes, and should be watered enough each time so that water comes out the drainage holes, and don't like to sit in water in a saucer. Putting some thought into runoff management will probably save some acrimony with your downstairs neighbor.

21 Nov, 2010

 

Is soil polymer lighter TG? as that's a consideration too on some balconies.

21 Nov, 2010

 

I don't know what soil polymer is, Drc... but when I did my balcony on moving in, I used 45% vermiculite or perlite mixed with multi purpose compost in all the tubs to keep it lighter.

21 Nov, 2010

 

Soil polymer is a kind of plastic gel that can hold up to 40 times its own weight in water. It usually has no effect on how much the soil weighs per liter (density) outside of an increased difference between wet and dry conditions. agar is a more natural alternative, but it doesn't usually last more than a month or two in healthy potting compost. Bamboo has the right formula for lightening the soil, Legostan, but just remember that perlite has a slight drying effect, so is better for succulents and other plants that need fast drainage.

22 Nov, 2010

 

Thanks Bamboo and TB

22 Nov, 2010

How do I say thanks?

Answer question

 


Related questions

Not found an answer?