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Russian Olive -- in bloom

Lori

By Lori


Russian Olive -- in bloom

Sweet smelling, scents the neighbourhood.



Comments on this photo

 

our olive looksfantastic. You've talked me into trying it. I'm in Utah right now and its everywhere. I love it!

23 Jun, 2008

 

It smells amazing...scents the neighbourhood and lasts for about two weeks!.. tiny green olive like fruit turn black and the birds really seem to like them.

23 Jun, 2008

 

I find the smell unattractive.....I seem to be in the minority though. When my neighbours tree was in flower I was working in the bed underneath the tree and the smell actually started making me feel ill...I wonder why??

25 Jan, 2009

 

hmmm.... to each his own, Gilli! ..it is common for certain very sweet smells to just turn us off completely...I've never experience that reaction to the RO...but it is very sweet and perhaps that tree was really laden with blossom... I do have that olfactory/stomach experience with the bridal wreath spirea though...can't stand it...so I sympathise.

25 Jan, 2009

 

It certainly was laden with blossoms Lori... That's funny...I quite like the bridal wreath spirea...LOL

25 Jan, 2009

 

My grandmother abhors russian olive, she can't stand the smell. She figures she's actually somewhat allergic to it, makes her all sniffly and her eyes swell up. Could be any number of things, when it comes to strong smells. I just love the russian olive look, haven't tested myself for illness.....lol :-)

25 Jan, 2009

 

allergies can be really hard to diagnose because we usually attribute our discomfort to the most visible (and as in the case of the E. the most aromatic) when the actual culprit hides in the grasses! Best example is ragweed and goldenrod..... because goldenrod grows tall and has visible flowers and states it's presence quite well...most hayfever sufferers think that they are reacting to it...when it is the much more prolific but infinitely less visible ragweed that is causing their miseries. I mentioned the bridal wreath spirea because I react to that...but can enjoy the smell of the RO without a twinge! Part of my rationale when buying plants has always been "it should be scented" ....and I think I've got the aromas mapped out pretty well ...so that the smells don't overlap...daphs, tulips, hyancinthes, and narcissii, Russian Olive, Amur Maple, peonies, acidanthera, lonicera (or so I thought), scented late summer blooming white hosta, and roses, etc. etc. Smells are a memory trigger, too. I have walked into a room where a vase of peonies transport me to my aunties living room in her farmhouse, and with bare legs, trying to sit comfortably on her horsehair upholstery!!

25 Jan, 2009

 

Smells are a strong memory trigger aren't they? Wallflowers take me right back to my Grandad's garden in England and playing in his shed which was an old air raid shelter that he had buried in the garden during WWII. He grew tons of wallflowers and they scented the air all over his garden.

25 Jan, 2009

 

ok...guess I'm just going to have to show my ignorance and ask...What do wallflowers look like Gilli? guess I should search on the best web gardening site, huh? lol....

1 Feb, 2009



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Pictures by Lori
269 of 2004

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This photo is of "Eleagnus augustifolia" in Lori's garden

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