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Warning ..Be Careful When Digging Up Your Spuds!

22 comments


Yes, it’s a warning from the BBC that, evidently Potatoes are easily confused with Dafodils so be careful when you dig your spuds up later this summer, that you don’t dig up and eat your Dafodils.Oh yes, that’s very likely, isn’t it?? Did you sense a hint of sarcasm there?
But, ,if you should, saute, roast, mash or even chip your Dafodils you will end up with a nasty belly ache!! They are right there, but is it very likely??
It would appear that Health England have written to major Supermarkets, warning of the dangers and suggesting that they don’t put Daffodil bulbs in the same aisle as Fruit and veg, to save a potentially dangerous confusion!!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-31176748
Made me chuckle any way
Happy gardening

Paul.

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Comments

 

It would make more sense to ban people that try to eat daffodils from supermarkets

7 Feb, 2015

bjs
Bjs
 

sounds like some more overpaid --------- with nothing better to do, anyone that can not tell the difference deserves stomach pains.

7 Feb, 2015

 

Ha ha.. Yes quite.It doesn't take a lot to know the difference.anyway....I shouldn't think Daffs mash very well!!!!,

7 Feb, 2015

 

One year we all bought seed Potatoes from supermarkets.
They never grew. Disaster !
My complaint to T&Ms Potato Manager brought forth the news that they were Dutch seed, had been sprayed because of the damp, and the spray blocked the shoots.

Never again. I always go to where I can get Scottish
Seed Potatoes. No more trouble.

8 Feb, 2015

 

People must be thick if they confuse a daffodil bulb with a potato.
An onion ... I could understand that ... but not a potato.

8 Feb, 2015

 

Sounds like H&S gone mad again!

8 Feb, 2015

 

Erm..one big difference..I've never seen loose Daffs in a Supermarket..only at Garden centres..if stupid people don't recognise a pretty flower on the bag,well..it beggars belief..unless they think they are a new brand of spud?? Duh ! One of my family manages a produce dept,and he just rolled his eyes at the thought ..:o) I bet some idiot will ask if they sell them in 2.5 or 5 kg bags..like the spuds..Yellow Maris Piper,anyone??? Lol

8 Feb, 2015

 

Given that many children these days don't seem to know that milk comes from cows, it makes one wonder just what they are being taught in schools. Or perhaps the teachers don't know either?

8 Feb, 2015

 

Ah but some bright spark shreaded the leaves it seems.......like chives?
whats that quote"its a crazy world we're living in!!"😲

8 Feb, 2015

 

hey Andrew don't go blaming the teachers! :o)
parents should be teaching their kiddies about this before they even get to school. Mine knew what animals become what food well before school. it was the government that took plant biology out of the curriculum. any way thanks to Gove's lets go back to the 1950's plant biology including bulbs tubers etc is back in the key stage 3 curriculum.

8 Feb, 2015

 

Thanks for your comments.....ha ha....yes, it is a bit crazy but, it seems, some organisations think we need spoon feeding and telling everything.But, it did make me smile!
Dafodils look nothing like Potatoes.Well, not last time I looked
What next....supermarkets not allowed to sell ginger in the same aisle as Iris rhizomes?? Just a thought.

8 Feb, 2015

 

That could be the next crazy idea Paul..how about Crocus corms versus Hazlenuts? Anymore comparisons you can think of ?

8 Feb, 2015

 

You've got me now.....I shall have to give it some thought.but, yes, hazelnuts and Crocus corms,I hadn't thought of that one!!

8 Feb, 2015

 

My mind works in mysterious ways,Paul..not always in a sensible mode :o)

8 Feb, 2015

 

No concern, the news people dig stories like this out of the waste paper basket when there is a slow news day or they can't get their head going on a good news story. Presently, the problem is how are they going to get their viewers (or readers) interested in this drivel that stretches the clock or fills in a sparse broadcast segment? The answer is to make the story highly personal but how to do that? Now comes an old trick. All the news broadcasters have to do is use "You" or "Your" in their headline telecast( this ploy is used in print too) to get one to watch the main program coming up an not to switch channels. They found that using the word "you" will give YOU the impression that what they have to say directly affects YOU personally and will cause YOU to be so concerned that YOU will stick around to watch the whole news program before they finally come up with the story. It's just another ploy to maintain or increase viewer ratings. This is my impression of what's going on when they come out with nonsensical stories like this. I understand that the BBC is publicly funded but ratings are important for those editors, writers, broadcasters and programmers there who want to keep their jobs in continuance.

9 Feb, 2015

 

I just watch the headlines. If its a load of nonsense, like the General Election (done to death already) Adrian Neal,
(ditto) or King Richard 3rd reburial ceremonies that will be taking 6 days, I switch off.

Give me GOY journalism every time.

9 Feb, 2015

 

Yes, they do talk some 'bilge'

9 Feb, 2015

 

now bilge is a word I've not heard for a while. was one of my dad's favourites along with codswallop! [Navy man so I got the bilge part but codswallop? well he liked to fish.]

10 Feb, 2015

 

Checking "codswallop" in the online dictionaries I have found that this term came into general use in the 1960's. The "swallop" refers to unpalatable things that could be edible if one were hungry enough such as some things found on a school cafeteria tray:) Cod, it seems, when used in this context could refer to the fish or could refer to the Middle English use of the term which I leave to those interested to look up and attach its meaning to swallop.

10 Feb, 2015

 

"Codswallop" is used quite often in Yorkshire..The meaning to us,relates to someone talking complete rubbish,as in "What a load of Codswallop" Thanks for looking it up,on our behalf,Loosestrife..

10 Feb, 2015

 

my dad was using it in the early sixties, I got my bottom smacked for repeating it when I was 5. I understood it to be the "cod's wallop". Wallop as rubbish.

10 Feb, 2015

 

Yes, codswallop was a word used quite a lot by my dad....he didn't swear.And, I still use it quite often!
I hear a lot of codswallop...particualrly when I go to football.Now, that is a good venue to hear lots of codswallop and bilge spoken!!!!!!!

10 Feb, 2015

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