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Prairie rose

17 comments


Look at that lovely rose…but do not get fooled. This is not an innocent little blushing rose it is a monster which cannot be tamed :-)

Climbing Prairie Rose (Rosa setigera) is said to grow to 15ft but this rose is probably 40 feet already, growing into a huge western cedar tree. It is about 15 feet wide and more I cut it the more it grows. Seems like it can grow indefinitely.

Here is the partial picture of the plant:

I often wonder how old it is. It is well established in its place. It has lovely red rosehips which I often cut and put into a vase. Unfortunately, it blooms just once a year (end of June)

We built a support about 8ft wide and 9ft high for it and it is not sufficient now. I am not concerned about the height, it is the width which worries me.

It was growing to the ground and deer loved it…. so I have trimmed it . At this level he cannot have it. I think he encouraged the rose to grow so wide on the bottom.

Interesting simple beauty and conversation piece.

On the other side of the support is a R. Kiftsgate, another monster rose climbing up the same tree. Interestingly, growing in mostly shade and therefore does not bloom so readily.

New shoots of Rosa filipes ‘Kiftsgate’

One day I will do something about them but for now they are free to do whatever they want.

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Comments

 

It is O.K if you have the space. Your gardens in Canada are probably huge due to the large size of the country and the small population. I have a London suburban garden which is smallish, so I can only grow short repeat flowering climbers.

24 Jun, 2014

 

Glad to hear that you are going to let them be for now Klahanie :))

24 Jun, 2014

 

Its lovely though isn't it -the cedar would look very bare without it now and hips are a bonus.

24 Jun, 2014

 

Hello Costas, we have 8 acres on Vancouver Island, so plenty of room, but mainly old forest, so very shady.

Thank you Michaella, thank you for your comment.

Stera, the cedar have branches fairly low. It is the Douglas firs which look like sticks.

Thanks all for visit.

24 Jun, 2014

 

Beautiful rose :-)

24 Jun, 2014

 

Thanks Simbad.

24 Jun, 2014

 

It's a beauty. It's obviously very happy there with you Klahanie.

24 Jun, 2014

 

It certainly likes its habitat and even though only lasting a few weeks it looks very attractive against the green backdrop........

24 Jun, 2014

 

It is absolutely on its own Scottish. It gets no attention from me at all. But I hope it will stay with us for a long time. I would miss it.

You are right Lincslass. It is interesting plant even after the blooms are gone.

25 Jun, 2014

 

Hi Klahanie!
It looks like our brier rose (Rosa canina). I wonder, if you can prepare from this prairie rose a rosehip tea, too. I have several pieces on borders of my garden and pick them each year, they are also very good natural barrier. A place, where I live, is a vineyard area. Wild roses are the only plants which are kept untouched by the owners. I do not know why, but thorns aren t probably the reason. And definitely, monsters look much more innocent :-)

25 Jun, 2014

 

It's a beautiful rose. Pity it doesn't flower for a longer time.

25 Jun, 2014

 

I remember the rosehip jam and tea my mom used to make Katarina. These rosehips do not appear to be edible.
We have wild roses in the ditches here on the Island as well. (Soon to be replaced by Scotch broom .)

Thank you Hywel for your comment.

25 Jun, 2014

 

When we were kids my mam used to give us Rose Hip Syrup :) Apparently it is full of vitamins, especially vitamin C.
She bought it from the chemist, but I think it is possible to make it yourself .... but I don't know which roses are used.

26 Jun, 2014

 

I can still see the rosehip tea in the stores(in little cubes) but not another products. Interesting that your mother bought the syrup from chemist, Hywel.

26 Jun, 2014

 

I suppose it was easier than making it :o)

27 Jun, 2014

 

It is very attractive against the dark greens of the woodlands.

27 Jun, 2014

 

Thank you Bathgate

29 Jun, 2014

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