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All our yesterdays...

119 comments


We have been chatting recently about our memories of when we were children and I thought it might be interesting and fun to do a blog on our shared experiences of that time. We remembered the seemingly slower pace of life ,the games and tricks we used to get up to and way we all were dressed especially in the cold weather. Vests and Liberty bodices, hand knitted scarves, hats, mittens and Woolley jumpers. Navy blue knickers ( some were posh enough to have a little hanky pocket sown in) and grey socks for school.
Mittens or gloves tied together on a length of elastic that threaded through the inside of your coat sleeves so you didn’t lose them. They dangled down,encrusted with clumps of ice from your coat sleeves, like dead rats after you had wet them through while snowballing….Careering down the hill on a brilliant home made sledge, trudging home tired but happy when you were hungry or your Dad came to fetch you for dinner or tea. Brilliant slides in the playground that were great until the caretaker threw grit down. (Pamg )
Little bottles of milk at morning break. Often in winter with the cream on top frozen pushing the bottle top up.
I wonder what you remember……

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Comments

 

I remember the awful smog in the early fifties. We lived in Wembley, and I remember being swathed in an extra scarf wound round my face to cover my nose and mouth. I also remember being taught to do "joined-up" writing by copying out verses from "Hiawatha" !!! As I was only six, it was totally meaningless to me - a complete mystery! When a friend of mine had whooping cough, I was put into quarantine and not allowed to school for a fortnight, in case I was infectious. Whoo! (I didn't catch it!). I remember using dip- in pens. There were inkwells in each desk, and the ink monitors brought ink round in copper cans like indoor watering cans. The ink was mixed from powder, was a rather unattractive greenish- black, and was sometimes a bit watery if it hadn't been mixed properly. I remember we always knew if we were going to be given cabbage for our meal : they started boiling it at about 10.30. It took me 50 years to discover that properly cooked cabbage is very good! We always called the midday meal "dinner" and our playtime snack we called "lunch" -odd... I loathed school dinners, and was usually the last in the dining hall, sitting staring miserably at cold cabbage until one of the cooks took pity on me and removed it. I'll eat anything now - I must have been a stubborn little thing!

6 Feb, 2015

 

Yes, the smogs were awful - I can remember putting my arm out in front of me and not being able to see my hand.

I can just remember the North Sea flood of 1953 - I have a memory of dad giving me a piggy-back down the street, which was ankle-deep in water where we lived in East London. Mentioned this years alter, and he said it must have been that awful event.

I can still remember learning to tie a knot-and-how, using tape pinned to a board, teacher telling me that "a bad workman blames her tools" because the dip-pen I was given had one of the points bent backwards and so couldn't write with it; school dinners with yellow cabbage (more stalk than leaf) and you weren't allowed to leave anything on your plate. I've still not got past the block that set up.

Outside toilets, tin bath in front of the fire, washing done in the copper in the kitchen, which was the only source of hot water, real snow in winter, the summers were six months long ... thunderstorms with proper forked lightning, glorious colours ...

The baker with his electric cart, but he walked in front, steering it with a tiller. The muffin man and toffee apple man ringing their bells

One-channel televisions, where the screen was so thick and curved it resembled a goldfish bowl. £1 radio licence, when Luxemburg was the only pirate radio station

6 Feb, 2015

 

I was with you up until the baker....in my my gran and grandads street it was Dolly the horse......
watch with mother on the tv, I still remember that, and family favorites in the radio that I still listen to on christmas morning each year with'Stewpot'......puff the magic dragon, My bruvver , tubby the tuba......Many many more......happy days

6 Feb, 2015

 

I remember coloured plastercine (can't spell it!) ... we used to call it 'clay'
It came in rows and you could 'peel' them off ...
Then they all got mixed into a horrible grey colour :o(

I remember throwing stones at the water boatmen (insects) gliding on the surface of the water in the canal, and trying to make them sink ! and collecting pilks in a jam jar :o)

6 Feb, 2015

 

Oh yes that schoolmilk was lovely except when they tried to warm it in front of the stove to thaw it out for us, I have never liked warm milk since, schools didn't close in those days and no excuses for not arriving just because the weather was bad, chilblains on fingers and legs because we got our socks wet and then had to wear them all day were a regular thing in the winter,
It was Uncle Mac on Saturdays way before Stewpot, don't think I ever knew his real name, thinking it was good if we were allowed to stay up and listen to the Archers on the radio before bedtime and having to be very quiet whilst it was on.
One horrible memory, having to walk to the gasworks every Saturday morning to collect a sack of coke for the beeston in the kitchen, used to have an old pushchair and the nasty man who loaded the sacks would never lift it in for us, I can picture him now sitting on his box in front of the scalepan, he was a b----r and didn't believe in helping anyone with the lifting, it was brilliant when the coalman started delivering it on the lorry with the coal, also I had reached the age of worrying in case any of my schoolmates saw me pushing a bag of coke back home, lol..
I was given a lovely book for my birthday about the Coronation Year and events that took place around the world during that year and can remember many of the photo's in that book, lots of them were the royals visiting the devastated and flooded areas, I remember being asked to take a penny to school for the collection, can also remember seeing all the floods on the newsreel at the cinema, we never had a telly in those days and sometimes if something suitable was on it was a special treat being taken to the pictures, however the news on the big screen was scary, at that age I had never been to the seaside so didn't know how far away it was, I had nightmares for ages after and mum said I couldn't go to the cinema anymore because the news had frightened me, mind you I'd also been taken down to our town meadows to see all the floods along Bath Row and my parents knew people living there, dad and his friend had been to help them, so of course I thought the floods were coming to our house as well, lol....
I can still smell the horrible gas mantles at my aunts house and also picture them fluttering in the draught when anyone opened the door, she never had electricity or any hot water in her house until the late 60's and the lavvie was outside but at least being in town it had a chain to pull when one had finished, I hated going to the toilet at nanna's because it was a huge wooden box along the yard and a further hole up the yard that workmen came to empty on Mondays, YUK!!!!!!!!

6 Feb, 2015

 

and there was only one flavour crisps, and only one brand, wtih the little screw pack of salt inside - my brother once found three salt packs in his bag, and used them all. he wasn't half ill afterwards. The first other-flavoured was I think, Chipmunk chicken.

school milk, a third of apint, I think, and school orange juice;

And Jubblies, which were so hard to get out of the pyramid-shaped pack; squeeze too hard and it leaped out and fell on the pavement; chews and blackjacks four a penny; Spanish Gold sweet toboacco (with sweet cigarettes, who'd think of it now??);

two-balls-up-the-wall (i could never do it, i kepft foretting to swtich the other ball to my right hand so i had an empty left hand to catch the one i'd thrown); skipping with joined-up elastic bands, fivestones, hopscotch, cat's cradle; gilrs tucking their skirts into their knickers to do handstands against the wall (couldn't do that, either)

and our first fridge was a bucket of water with a length of butter muslin kept damp; butter was impossible to spread in winter.

6 Feb, 2015

 

Two-ball - loved it! Skipping with one's own rope or in a group with a long piece of washing line. The feeling of achievement when I mastered the art of jumping in OVER the rope! Playground activities had their seasons - hopscotch (and "Irish" hopscotch), bead swapping, jacks and fivestones, marbles, French knitting... all so important and necessary to have the right accessories to join in! Playing Grandmother's Steps and Golden River and Nuts in May, "dipping" for leaders etc (dip, dip, dip, my little ship...one potato, two potato!). I know playground activities are not so varied these days. I used to use outdoor games lessons with Reception children teaching them "In and out the dusty bluebells", "Farmer's in his den" , "Do you know the muffin man?" etc. Fun, and a good way to get to know each other.

My father worked away from home, and my parents bought a television set in the early fifties. My mother had explained that it would be a box with pictures that moved. My imagination worked overtime - needless to say, the reality wasn't quite what I'd expected, which was based on a family photgraph on the mantelpiece!

6 Feb, 2015

 

This is wonderful - I'm dripping with nostalgia now, so many memories. Do you remember the smell of the infants school, a sort of mixture of chalk dust and cabbage? What about the rag and bone man - you could hear him coming a long way off "Any old rags, any old rags, donkey stone for rags..."
And Rowntrees fruit gums were 3d and Mars bar was fourpence halfpenny - so was a large white loaf. And the bedroom was so cold my water froze ont he dressing table and I can remember pulling my clothes under the bedcovers to warm them up and getting dressed under the blankets. Pity about the wash first...
And when it snowed we either kept our wellies on all day or borrowed school plimsolls from a big tea chest in the classroom - you had to sort out two of the same size...and oh the chilblains on your toes all winter!

6 Feb, 2015

 

Wow, so many great memories. I loved to go blackberrying in the autumn with all of our local family. We used grandmas walking stick to pull down the briars to pick the big juicy ones from high up. Putting them into big jam jars with string tied round the top as a handle. Purple juice staining our hands that took ages to wash off. Buying windfall fruit from a local orchard....6pence for a great big bag full...and Mother making jams and pies. Picking up potatoes, carrots and sprouts that dropped off the tractor trailer on the lane. Looking for blue stalk mushrooms with my Dad on a Sunday morning at the side of the field.
I loved to go to the entrance to the wood afterwards to watch the hunt assemble dressed in their red coats on lovely horses. The hounds barking and eager to run. My Dad always told us there was only one fox, called Brer Fox in the woods and he was so cunning they never ever caught him and that the hunt was organised just to exercise the horses and hounds. We believed every word our Dad told us!!!

6 Feb, 2015

 

Oh! I loved Skipping games, especially the ones where just about every girl in school joined in. I loved two ball too although I wasnt too good at overs. I tried to teach my daughter but she just never seemed to have hand- eye coordination...lol I liked playing marbles under the street light, I lost more pretties than I ever won. My brother liked playing with bollies. When I was 10 I was given a massive old bike. My best friend ( who had a New Raleigh, her family were a bit posh) used to cycle all over the place taking a bottle of water and some homemade bread and jam and a piece of fruit cake for a picnic. Nobody bothered us and there weren't that many cars about. I'd learned to ride on a bike with no tyres or brakes whilst staying at my Aunties when I was 7 while my Mum gave birth to my brother. It was a fantastic surprise to come home after several weeks to find this baby in a cot in the front room. I had no idea where he had come from but I loved him.

7 Feb, 2015

 

Oh great memories, I was born in '52 so don't remember the coronation...I think we went to my aunties as they had a telly......
playground games, and after school too when we 'played out' until it got dark and the children shouting Just 5 more minutes......
Uncle Mac.....how could I forget him
and listen with mother " are you sitting comfortably. ....then I'll begin" 😊

7 Feb, 2015

 

Such memories you have all brought back ,I remember them all..toast done on a toasting fork on the coal fire,never tasted as good since..logs spitting on the fire,and burning holes on those half moon ready cut ones with a design in the middle.Me and my mum used to make them together,and before that,the ones where you cut up any suitable material you could find,to make the rag ones with a special hook..I still have ours ! I used to go 'chumping' with my dad for wood to chop up for a stockpile in the winter..We didn't respect trees much then,as we needed to survive the harsh weather..The horrible smell of the gas masks in case of a bombing raid..which also had the same smell as the one at the Dentists,if you had to be 'put out'..Blackout curtains..and getting told off for peeking through to see the skies lit up over Manchester or Sheffield when they were bombed..being given the cream off the top of the milk,as it was 'good for me'..Hardly seeing my dad ,who almost seemed like a stranger when he came home on a weekend leave,and waking up one morning,in our one bedroom tiny house,to see him in bed with mum,and saying "ooh,it's the Milkman " ! Lol..it took her all weekend to convince him she wasn't having an affair ..:o)
Seeing the sea for the first time,after the war,and so excited at going on a steam train to Blackpool..Having my first packet of crisp there..Smith's I think,with the little blue bag of salt..Still remember the how good they tasted...first dip in the freezing sea,in an emerald green nylon bathing costume,stitched together in little squares..and see through when wet,and clinging like a limpet to your skin....no worries,at 6 years old :o)Passing the 11 plus,and meeting dad off the bus to tell him..received with mixed feelings,as he had promised me a bike if I did :o) I loved my second hand bike with it's three Sturmey Archer gears..thought I was the bees knees,till I bumped down the hill on it,and I couldn't turn the corner...straight over someones privet at the bottom.. I didn't know what happened when you had a flat tyre Lol..Those heavy wool blankets in the winter,sometimes with a coat on top,and scraping the Ice off the inside of the windows in the mornings..hand knitted cover on a hot water bottle to stop you burning....those 'attractive' round plastic glasses we were prescribed,when the teacher realised you couldn't see the Blackboard properly..I was 10 then..two choices of colour..one dark brown,and one flesh coloured..not a good look..and noticing my neighbour's curtains had a design on them,for the first time !
Good old days? mostly,but at least everyone was the same,so we didn't know any different..I think we could go on forever,but I love reading all your memories:o)

7 Feb, 2015

 

They were happy days Bloomer, we forget the worst bits I guess, it was I think a much simpler world when being a child was just that, and not a mad rush to be adult or appear on the telly as seems many childrens ambition...
we didn't have homework until big school, the first exams really was the 11+
now even primary school children seem to have both
I don't understand though how so many are still unable to read and write properly.....
or am I just getting old😨

7 Feb, 2015

 

I think we are all targeted by TV,and advertising these days,which is inescapable really..especially for children..so much is geared to them,in all sorts of ways,and not always for the better..How many parents seem to just leave the TV on all day,whether they are watching or not..and how many younger ones seem to be allowed to watch anything which would be deemed unsuitable..and not take parental control? No wonder they grow up far beyond their years sometimes..not their fault,as it is the norm for some..
I think their teachers must despair at times,and they have a hard task,but they do the best they can .I read somewhere,that some don't even know their names or other simple tasks a 4/5 year old should know,when they start school..On the other hand,programmes for children are excellent,and educational in most cases,so TV has it's good points..I learnt more about Bob the Builder, Mr Tumble,and Postman Pat,than i ever did before Thomas came along ! Lol..Not too old to still learn,it seems :o)

7 Feb, 2015

 

It is so easy to look back with rose-coloured spectacles, but life was certainly simpler and slower when we were children. I daresay that's exactly what our parents thought as well! The rate of change is definitely faster now, though. Technology is moving at a breathtaking rate. We'd have been amazed at the idea of communicating like this, wouldn't we? Or of shopping and banking without leaving the armchair!

It is nice to enjoy a bit of nostalgia now and then, isn't it?

Infant schools still have a distinctive smell, but I am happy to say that cabbage doesn't feature so strongly these days!

7 Feb, 2015

 

I remember reading of an English person working in an office in the US, and when she wrote letters by hand they'd all stand around admiringly, cos they'd never seen joined-up writing; they'd all learned from computers. It does seem to be a dying art.

I was born in '52, too, and I still have my Coronation cup and saucer, got to find a suitable stand to display them on.

lol wiht out first TV, the dot would take ages to disapper when you turned it off. I thought that it was a kind of "freeze", that when you turned it back on it'd pick up where it had stopped when you turned it off.

We lived in a Nissen hut for my first 12 years, corrugated iron roof, freezing in winter, boiling in summer, spieders all year round. I went bac decades later; they've got houses there now. made me feel odd to think that I'm older than those houses!

There wasn't so much traffic in those days, we could stretch a washing line right across the road for "group skipping", though it didn't half make your arm tired, keeping the rope going.

7 Feb, 2015

 

Mines a 1/2 pint coronation beer mug! .......I was a may baby Fran.....
lucky enough to get my state pension in may too, a friend a september baby has to wait I think to march this year...

I think my parents had a harder childhood, at work at 14.......The 60's was a great time to grow up.....

7 Feb, 2015

 

I'm an April baby, and qualified for my state pension last April, though no one bothered to tell me in accessible format until July.

I thought it was a Coronation mug, but that was a Jibilee one, mum was looking after mine till I had a place to keep it.

I think preceding generations each had it harder than the one before, child welfare wasn't on everyone's agenda, even if they'd ever heard of it. Those were the days when "I'll take my belt to you" wasn't just a figure of speech.

Across the road from us was a bombsite where some houses had been; there was plenty of rubble to play in and on, We called it the debris (pronounced debry).

Saturday morning picutres (I was only allwoed to go once). lol I really resented being a girl; my brother went every week. And boys had much better comics - The Eagle, with Dan Dare and so on. what did girls have? Bunty and Sandra and the Secret Ballet". shee.

7 Feb, 2015

 

I remember living in a cold water flat with the privy outside. I did not know what hot water out of a faucet was until I was 11 years old. All baths during the week were sponge baths with the regular bath on Saturday night. Freezing in the winter with the flat being heated by a stove hot plate in the kitchen, my mother cocooning me with blankets in the winter, and sweating it out in the summer with a cooling breeze from an oscillating fan every 10 seconds, yada, yada, yada...etc. I had a wonderful life as a child for two reasons; First I had wonderful caring parents who endeavoured to make things better for their family eventually and second, at the time, that was my life and I didn't know anything else. As far as play with my friends it was all street games, dodge ball, stick ball, statue, 1,2,3 red light, flip, tag your it, playing sometimes late into the night under a street light. During the games, one of us always looked out for cars and would loudly yell " Car Coming" so we could run to the street sides. As far as security, at that time there was little need for it but someone's grandmom was found to be watching us from a window.

7 Feb, 2015

 

It was a lot less worry free for us children. It was safe to play out in the street even after dark under the street lights. Everyone knew everyone in the village and noticed any strangers and were wary. We were warned about any dubious characters and knew to ignore or avoid them.
Do you remember the knife sharpener coming round? We loved to watch him with his hand peddled grinder. My Dad used to sharpen our knives by rubbing them backwards and forwards on the back door step. They were really sharp afterwards. It gradually wore away the centre of the step in a curve shape.
In our first house we had electricity supplied from the colliery. Just light fittings in the ceiling and if you bought an electric iron when you wanted to iron anything you had to plug it in to the light. Mostly ironing was done on Tuesday's (after wash day Monday) using the flat iron heated on the copper boiler at the side of the fire. No running hot water then, they had to fill the boiler and wait for it to warm up, and heat the pans full on the fire until a gas cooker was installed. The gas smelled awful. I liked our tin bath which the whole family used on a Sunday night. Mother first then the kids. Dad used the pit head baths.
If your dad worked at the pit he could buy really good towels and Imperial leather soap cheaply from the pit baths.

8 Feb, 2015

 

Sounds like my grandparents house homebird, I'd forgotten the iron, they took the only bulb out to plug the iron in!
they had an old blacklead range, fire in the middle water one side and an oven the other.....and me under the table with the toasting fork.....

I was nearly april Fran, 2nd may.....so you're older than me then🌞

My aunt and uncle lived across from gran & grandad so I read all my cousins marvel comics and went to the saturday rush at the pictures.....he was older than me and tolerated me going ......always westerns and so much noise.......happy days

Anyone remember that tepid orange drink with a plastic straw.....yuck!
And the wooden spoon with the icecream tub that gave you splinters if you licked too hard!

8 Feb, 2015

 

Yes, Homebird! I had almost forgotten the Knifesharpener and now you have brought up other memories of mine such as the " junk man" who came around the neighborhood in a horse drawn cart. You could hear him coming from the sound of old pots and pans clanging together as they were strung across the back of his cart. Not only was fresh milk delivered but fresh baguettes of bread were delivered daily and I now recollect we even had a street singer. With the street singer money was either thrown to him from the window to get him to sing a favorite song or money was tossed to him to get him to stop singing:) It is all coming back to me and I think I will now write all of these recollections down since they seem to be so easily forgotten these days. In retrospect, whether the times were harder back then or now depends upon ones relative point of view. But, one thing is for certain now that I am looking back.....within ones own social surroundings they were much more respectful, civilized and congenial times. Oh yes, one other thing, I grew up without the TV. My childhood was occupied with books and the radio. By today's standards, this filling of young minds with knowledge displacing fantasy was at a snails pace but it left the child time to develop an inner voice. Between books or pages of books I would talk to myself about the subject matter which is a means by which I retained that knowledge and found ways to make it apply to my ways of thinking. Now, information is coming into the young brain at warp speed from all directions, leaving no time to think about what it means or how to apply it or to consider its consequences. When this input stops, young minds are going blank in that they are not taking this time to think for themselves for a while. Instead this time is utilized for finding more preoccupying mental input which is moving at too fast a speed for the adolescent brain to handle properly. These are my thoughts. I know there are some that would think that I am over generalizing, finding that this is not at all the case with their children or grandchildren and wouldn't be at all hesitant in telling me so but the effects of new ways informational input(such as the one that I am using right now) can be seen by not looking at the few but by viewing the many.

8 Feb, 2015

 

I think you have some good points there Loosestrife. Interacting with an I pad or gameing thingy must be isolating. Children would be better off playing and using imagination outside with good friends more often than they are using there electronic gadgets. I see the difference with my sons children and my daughters children. My daughters watch very little TV, play outside a great deal, visit places such as the Deep, museums and interactive educational facilities. They read books together each evening and are inquisitive and progress really well at school and are very social. They love pretend play, I'm usually the mother or shop keeper...lol. They are allowed, and enjoy occasional use of an iPad to play phonic games. It's probably due to my daughter being a school head. My sons children play on their iPods a lot. When they are here I can keep them entertained with baking or footy outside for a short time in the garden and for periods with board games. They prefer to play indoors and at home the TV is never off. Reading is something you have to do for homework and the cry of " it's boring" drives me nuts..
I remember reading " the Borrowers" for the first time when I was still in junior school and my imagination was fired. I still love that book.
I imagined I was Hiedi as I read the Hiedi books too.
Parents seem so busy these days, both working and children only seeing their parents shortly before bedtime and at weekends. It's a diferent world these days.
Did you have prizes from Sunday school. We used to get books. Once a year we were taken by the teachers on the train to the seaside. I mostly remember the train journey, head through the train window, the scent of the smoke and steam from the engine filling our noses. Wonderful...

8 Feb, 2015

 

All these comments would make a wonderful booklet for junior schools or even lower senior schools. Anybody volunteering as editor?

Its been a real joy reading them all.

8 Feb, 2015

 

Apart from tin baths or standing-in-a-bowl-of-water sponge-down ...my godparents had a flat that had the toilet IN the kitchen. There was the sink, and the draining board lifted up and there was the toilet with its own lid. And no space for even a tin bath.

Sounds incredible now that anyone could have designed such an arrangement and not thought there was anything wrong iwth it.

8 Feb, 2015

 

OMGoodness, what a design Fran. I've been in wooden bungalow type huts that had the bath under a board in the Kitchen. Most of them had bathrooms added on at the back eventually.
When I was 7, I stayed with an aunty and my 3 cousins in an old farm house with no running hot water, just a very large stone sink in the scullery, with the one cold water pipe coming up through the floor with a massive tap connected to it bent over the Belfast sink. There was a well in the front garden that was used to water the veg plot. I didn't have a proper wash, never mind a bath the whole month I was there.!! I remember the lovely aroma of potato peelings, windfall apples, pears and plums simmering in the boiler heated by a wood fire underneath. This was to feed the pigs and chickens. We kids helped ourselves to the fruit in the orchard.
We walked everywhere, very few buses then.
Can you remember the Co operative Divi number you had to remember when you shopped at the co op for different people. Woe betide you if you didn't get that person's number right and someone else got their Divi....

9 Feb, 2015

 

I can homebird.....learning it so young its my pin number!

my cousin and I had to go to the co op for gran on saturday mornings for milk checks blue? And bread checks yellow I think

9 Feb, 2015

 

4715......That was mum's number, I've never forgotten that, I had one when I was first married but cannot remember that one and never did get anything from it, I stopped using it when the Co-op closed down in our town..
My love of books started first with Noddy, then moved on to anything I could find by Enid Blyton, however my all time favourite was Black Beauty, we were encouraged to read and used to always get new books at xmas and birthdays, joined the library when I was 7yrs old and plagued the life out of mum and dad because I'd always read my books immediately and in those days the children section was only open on Tuesday and Saturday afternoons, I was always demanding a new reading book from the school and even today I cannot sleep at niht without a read first......

9 Feb, 2015

 

I loved my books too.My first memory was of Roly Robin,in the Woman's Weekly magazine..passed on to us by our neighbour...Enid Blyton being my Favourite. in later years,.followed by the Secret Seven..Black Beauty was a must,as was What Katy did,and What Katy did next,along with Heidi....I was always happy to receive a book and a Jigsaw for Christmas and birthdays,if nothing else..which was about all my parents could afford,and maybe something to wear....
As I got older,I loved a School Friend Annual,or Girls's Crystal..By then we were a bit more affluent,and my mum had the weekly versions delivered..I was always waiting with anticipation each week :o) I also joined the Library at an early age...My Grandson joined when he was three,and loves going to choose one every two weeks,along with the ones he brings home from School,and has a bedtime story read to him every night,as did our Daughter..What goes around,comes around ,thank goodness..long live tradition:o)

9 Feb, 2015

 

I remember frosty windows (on the inside!), sleeping in a room with my siblings and my nan, with coats on the bed as there wasn't enough blankets (but can't ever remember being cold). I remember playing strange games in the street (Please Jack can I cross your golden river?) and a ball game where to start the ball was thrown up as high as possible (that had to stop when people started buying cars). I remember picking at the newly laid tar in the road with a lolly stick, learning to ride a two wheeled bike while my brother and friend played motor-bike riders (we lived near Wimbledon Stadium) on my Gresham Flyer tricycle. I remember starting school at 4 in the church hall, 30 children from 4 to 14 (leaving age) all in one classroom with one teacher - only from 9.30 to 1 o'clock. I still remember lots of things I learnt there too :)

9 Feb, 2015

 

Such great memories. You made me remember that I had a great little 3 wheeled bike when I was about 5. It had a tin boot and a sort of walking stick that your parents could pull out at the back so they could push you or hold you back. I rode to the Coop for my mum and a car reversed into it. It broke it beyond repair. I was devastated. It was back to Shankses pony then as I didn't get another bike until I was about ten or eleven.

14 Feb, 2015

 

Do you remember the pansions our mothers and grandmas used to mix the bread dough in? My sister, brother and I used ours one year to put the goldfish in that we won at the fair that used to come to the village. The fair hasn't been to the village for donkeys years.

14 Feb, 2015

 

I had the Girl comic and my brother The Eagle, we made dens and wagons with apple crates, my brother made fires at the bottom of the garden and roasted whatever he could kill with a catapult..........we walked to school, even though we had a van........
My Father was a farmer and butcher and he kept pigs and collected leftovers from the army and the local schools and cooked it up to make swill!! it was disgusting, can still remember the smell even now!!
We went on picnics to the local beauty spots, and had tea made from water cooked in a kettle over a homemade fire, and played hide and seek in the bracken!!
We played cards with our grandparents usually with halfpennies, and we had Vimto on a Sunday as a treat....
If we were ill we had Fennings Fever cure, syrup of figs or liquid paraffin to keep our bowels open ( not that we had any idea what bowels were!!)
We went to the slaughterhouse with our father and thought nothing of seeing a pig being slit open.....
We picked sprouts in the freezing cold, with numb fingers, but there was always food on the table even though there was ice inside on the windows, it never did us any harm, great times!!

15 Feb, 2015

 

What a great childhood Dd. My grandad kept pigs and chickens. We always had good bacon and pork. My grandad used to collect the 'slops' from the school kitchens every day to mix with the feed for the pigs. My grandmother always seemed to have a biscuit tin by the fireside with day old chicks in. We loved to hold the tiny yellow balls of fluff. They had a really fierce cockerel and you had to defend yourself with the copper stick when you collected the eggs!!! It's a wonder that cockerel had any sense in its head the number of times it was clubbed!! Our house was built on the land he used to rent to keep the pigs on. Pity he didn't own it, It would have saved us a fortune when this house was built. Lol

15 Feb, 2015

 

Fantastic memories, everyone! I fit in somewhere in-between, being born in 1947, and for most of my young life I thought of WW1 as ancient history. Even so, playground games, horse-drawn delivery vans and cold rooms away from the living-room fire are part of my heritage. But I am lucky enough always to have known hot and cold running water and electricity. OH, though not 2 years older than me, grew up with no bathroom, one cold water tap (eventually complemented by an Ascot heater) in the kitchen and gas only.

Loosestrife, I agree with you. All the modern technological means of communication/recreation are great (I am typing this on my i-Pad!) but reflection is an essential part of learning, and in my view, necessary for good mental health and sanity. Some things are transient, and that's fine, but balance is essential. Let's hope that we retain some balance...

15 Feb, 2015

 

I'd completely forgotten the joys of picking up melted tar from the edge of the road Gee - thanks for that! Winnie the Pooh, Sunny Stories, Famous Five (but they weren't called that then)Rupert Bear, and then the Chalet School books,oh and Ballet Shoes - nearly wore that one out! I think I could still quote bits of it now. Did you read that somebody was objecting to Barbar the Elephant recently, I think on the grounds that the king of the elephants shouldn't be French...

15 Feb, 2015

 

Oh Stera!.......its like the fairy tales, the scary bits in little red riding hood where the wolf eats grandma for example have been airbrused out.....seems children aren't allowed to be scared any more,

how will they learn that there is bad as well as good, on one hand the stories are bland and on the other the real world intrudes every day with the most awful things shown on the 24 hour news channels and newspapers, I dislike seeing it so how do children feel?
or is it not Real to them?

16 Feb, 2015

 

PC gone mad,re Air brushing out,Pam ? I didn't know that .Not at our house they aren't,as Thomas loves them . I kept most of my daughters old Ladybird books,and he wasn't phased by gory bits and pictures at all,in fact Little Red Riding hood was one of his favourites..We are now on all the Mr Men /Miss books,,going right back to the 70's..and it's lovely reading them to him again..He loves the DVD version too,narrated by Arthur Lowe,which is a really long playing one..
I agree they see much worse things on the TV,and other Media,and it's almost impossible to avoid..I think they take it all in their stride,and the younger ones don't realise how it affects them,but surely the seeds of such bad things are being planted in tiny minds,to be regarded as 'normal' ,as they grow up?...
I remember the first time I went to the Cinema to watch an X rated film aged 15/16..I was under age at the time,as I think you had to be 18,but I borrowed' my mum's Cuban heeled shoes,and a pair of her stockings..probably held up with elastic bands ..as most mum's wore those horrid corsets with whalebones in them,with suspenders attached....oh Joy ! Lol.

I got in ok,but spent most of the time,hiding my head under my coat,as I found it so scary...It would probably be on C Beebies these days .!.:o)

16 Feb, 2015

 

Bloomer I did the same, went to the cinema to see Dracula!! frightened myself to death, went to bed wearing a crucifix! unfortunately we didn't have any garlic then!! We used to hide behind the sofa when The Quartemass Experiment was on, far more scary than the Doc nowadays........

16 Feb, 2015

 

Lol,Angela..we were so naive,weren't we? I always had a .cushion to hide behind ,when Quatermass was on..We used to watch it my friends house,on a Saturday..her mum and dad used to go out,so it was our version of a scary girly night in....We decided to make some toffee one night,and burnt her mum's new pan so badly,it had to be thrown away..Barred from the kitchen forever ! :o)
I had never heard of Garlic in those days..salt and pepper was about the only addition to meals..or fresh Parsley in a sauce with Fish,was about as adventurous as it got! I'm still pretty traditional,as far as food goes...:o)

16 Feb, 2015

 

Oh those suspenders Sandra - horrible pink elastic. In my first year at high school we all had to go to a service in the cathedral for some celebration or other and we all had to wear "nylons". My friend's mother (who had more money than mine) bought her a dainty teens suspender belt and her own stockings but I had to borrow my mum's old one. The stockings were 30 denier and not even new. I was only eleven and was totally humiliated.

16 Feb, 2015

 

Weren't they just the pits,Sue? How they coped with those horrible things,I don't know! My mum's nylons were 30 denier too..and an awful colour :o)..I never saw my mum with bare legs,even on the hottest of days..and she still wore a vest,plus a full strappy petticoat..remember those?
She must have been roasting :o)

16 Feb, 2015

 

Oh my I remember being scared many a time at the cinema and then having to walk home in the dark, trying hard to not show my fear to my mates and giggling instead, Dracula and Frankenstein never bothered me, the ones I didn't like were creepy crawlies made to look huge or a film that played on your mind, you know the ones that the horror was psychological rather than monster, even today I can watch anything gruesome but refuse to watch anything that preys on your mind, I can stomach the grisly bits as long as I can actually see them but my mind goes in overdrive when its a case of imagining the horror....

16 Feb, 2015

 

There was a movie filmed in the UK but the place of action was in the USA and its title is "The Haunting" (1963 original version). This one preys on ones mind to a most masterful degree. If you dare to, you can watch the whole movie on You Tube...but don't do it alone. :o!

16 Feb, 2015

 

The earliest film I remember that scared me,was "Wizard of Oz " Lol.lots of other kids were crying,and I stuck it out for a bit longer,then I had to be taken out as well..but one film ,a musical,with Bing Crosby,I think..I sung my heart out when they started singing"You are my Sunshine",and got an applause from the audience,for my solo performance.:o).My mum had just taught me all the words off the Radio..must have been about 3 or 4.. Lol..

16 Feb, 2015

 

Ahhhh! Bless your little socks...

16 Feb, 2015

 

Oh! Suspenders and stockings...so uncomfortable. I remember my mother had one of those awful rubbery corset, I think it was playtex, with tiny holes all over it that left her skin looking like she had measles when she took it off....lol. My mother bought me black stockings and a suspender belt when I left home when I was nearly sixteen to be a cadet nurse. It was part of the uniform we had to wear. It was great when patients bought you a pair as a thank you gift because they were expensive and we had to provide our own. We had to provide our own duty shoes and cardigans too. I loved my cape though, it was so thick and warm. Wish I'd kept it when I finally left that hospital. When I went off to live in the nurses home I was earning £230 per year and £120 of that was taken out for board and lodging. It didn't leave much to buy clothes or go out far. Good job all the boys insisted on paying when we went to the pictures. We weren't allowed to marry until you completed the training in those days. That's why T and I didn't marry until 1970 when I qualified.

16 Feb, 2015

 

Memories! I used to buy one pair of new stockings a week when I started work in 1958, and by The Friday believe me I needed them...I think the cheapest were 3/11d. If they laddered midweek you just had to stop the ladder asap with a dab of clear nail varnish. I got £4/10/00 a week and when I got a rise to £5 it was riches!!

16 Feb, 2015

 

Ooh scary memories of Quatermass.....and remember the Fly......a man with a flies head 😨

dumbing down doesn't help the children, my cousin put an old Lassie film on for her grandchildren and later went in a very quiet lounge to see the children sobbing as Lassie was hurt and limping home......things happen that are sad in the real world, she had to fast forward to the happy ending😊

17 Feb, 2015

 

Bloomer, I love to hear the little children singing. I bet your Mum was so proud of you. I have a photo of myself after singing in a competition at the Miners holiday camp when I was about 6. All I remember of it is not liking the man who was standing with me to give me the present. I've never been brave enough to watch horror movies. I say that I have too vivid an imagination too Lincs. I used to watch Quatermass and The Outer Limits with my Dad. " do not adjust your sets" lol. The scariest film I've ever seen was Christine. The funniest I think was 'What's up Doc' with Barbara Steisand and Ryan O'Neil. The cinema was in chaos with people laughing so much. My sides were aching from laughing during the runaway scene.
I just remembered the Whip and tops we used to play with. And the pair of stilts I plagued my parents for, the local woodworker made a pair for me. I loved them. I don't think I've seen children playing with these things for donkeys years. I remember my cousins punching a hole in the bottom of two tins and threading a long length of string from one tin to the other, pulling the string tight and talking into one tin and one listening with the other tin up to their ear. Early mobile telephone??? I've seen something very similar in a play park with metal pipes under the ground linked to ear and speaking boxes. My young grandchildren found these fascinating.
Pam I remember watching Lassie and crying my eyes out too. Sunday afternoon films were often weepies as I recall. Oh! And I loved Old Mother Riley. I never knew she was actually Kitty's husband until I was in my twenties...lol

17 Feb, 2015

 

Oh,the whip and top,H.bird.drawing different coloured rings on the top with chalk...Do you remember French knitting we used to do,with four nails stuck in the top of an empty bobbin of cotton,and we used any left over bits of wool to make a long length.. When it was long enough,and snake like,it was stitched into a circle,to use as yet another table mat,or to stand an ornament on,much to my mum's dismay:o) I loved doing that..The long scarves which were knitted,with some rows done on a massive knitting needle..size 0 or 1,to make a holy,lacy effect..and there was also a craze of knitting a square piece,with a wider strip at one end,to make it look like a polo necked jumper,and you used it to tuck inside your coat,instead of a scarf...I'm going into older childhood now..Buying lovely buttons to match a hand knitted cardigan..I had our old Button tin for years,as you always cut buttons off,before you threw any item away..you could always find one to reuse,if one came off a mans shirt,or similar..I can't remember the last time i had to sew a button on ! My Daughter had hours of pleasure playing and looking through our button tin..:o) I wish sometimes,I hadn't got rid of it.

I could never master Crochet,probably as I wasn't so keen on it as knitting..and my late Aunt used to do lovely tatting..I still have lots of the table mats she did,and also beautiful hand embroidered Tablecloths,on Irish Linen,by another Aunt..They are never used now,as sadly they don't fit my table,but I can't part with any of them..I do still used some of the tatted mats though,under plant pots ,to stop them scratching painted surfaces..

17 Feb, 2015

 

I still knit , usually for me but just about finished the last ball of frilly scarf yarn (one ball makes a scarf)the online wool shop I use had a sale, 99p a ball instead of 7.50 lots of pressies....
it took me ages to fathom the method, you only use 6 stitches....
.
And crocheting is back in fashion too, just gave my neighbour a lesson, as I was showing her I watched my hands remembering how to do it without me thinking.....and frightened the life out of myself when I realised it was..... 50 ......years ago that I learnt!

loved reading all the childhood things that are being forgotten, not while we're around 👵

17 Feb, 2015

 

Yes, the French knitting Bloomer..I do remember making mats to stand the teapot on. Also the button tin. I still have one and my children then grandchildren loved to thread them on thin wool. Did you ever make a whistling circle of card. You know, with a disc of cardboard with 2 holes punched approximately in the centre. String threaded through the holes and tied together about 6-8 inches either side of the card. Twist the disc round and round them when the string is sufficiently twisted pull on each end of the strings and the card kept whizzing backwards and forwards as you alternately pulled tight /relaxed the string. The disc used to whistle or make a buzzing sound. I must try that again to show my grandchildren.
Those frilly scarves are lovely Pam. My mother tried to show me how to knit one using the special wool but I got into such a mess with it she had to finish it for me...
I like crocheting Pam. Especially baby shawls but we don't have any more babies so I just crochet borders around blankets that my sister knits for her charities. Lol.
Did you make Peggy rugs? I seemed to spend hours cutting or tearing old clothes into strips for my grandma to use for the peg rugs she made. Some were really big and would cover nearly all of the kitchen floor. I liked having a go with the hook but it did make your fingers sore after a while. I think she used old hessian sacks opened up to weave the cloth into.

17 Feb, 2015

 

Oh yes, we called those card discs on string Buzz Saws for some reason. My grandma used to make pegged rugs, using strips cut from worn out coats etc. All the older ladies seemed to have one in front of the kitchen range. I felt we were very posh when we started to have wool ones instead - you pulled the wool through open weaved canvas backing with a sort of crochet hook. If you were grand you bought Readicut wool and designs but we had left over lengths from the mill and cut it to length ourselves. I still have a button box too, but never seem to need to use it.

17 Feb, 2015

 

My first film was "Oz", too - I hid behind the seat in front when the Wicked Witch came on!

18 Feb, 2015

 

Gran had peg rugs, mum and I did a readicut between us, a gift I think, we had an end each and had to make sure we did it the right way or the nap was wrong......bit of undoing until we realised!
if you look on Deramores website there are lots of free patterns to crochet and knit, oh and I got a pattern book on my kindle for cute crochet squares one with an owl on, and another on tunisian crochet. ....so much out there, itsfinding it!

I love making things 😊

18 Feb, 2015

 

loved reading this. I love making things too. I have noticed so many of the old skills reappearing...both my girls can knit and enjoy making things. Sewing also seems to be making a come back. I still make rag rugs and with the invention of nylon fleece jumpers/dressing gowns it doesn't frey like the old cottons. I treasure my mams button tin full of all sorts and sizes but rarely the one you want...
I remember the first colour tv arriving..i was amazed that the play school clock was blue.

18 Feb, 2015

 

The old Avengers is on sky .....in black & white......gosh they look young.....

18 Feb, 2015

 

The first thing we girls had to knit at school was a dishcloth using knitting cotton. (Last year I found a bag full of balls of unbleached knitting cotton in a charity shop. Someone had started crocheting place mats and obviously given up or gone to meet their maker. I found a free knitting patern for dishclothes online ( must find it out) and made dishclothes for my friends and relatives. They have the patern of a butterfly in the centre. Really simple to do and very quick...lol)
We progressed to a scarf once we had stopped dropping stitches. I was at the back of the queue as they handed out the wool and I ended up having to use 2 balls of 4 ply twisted together. It was horrible. I hid it in the bottom of the very big work basket as I hated it. The teacher miraculously found me some proper double knitting wool because my knitting had been misplaced..lol I remember it was a lovely bright red.
Did your school have the very high windows that you weren't tall enough to see through. Ours did. I remember just being able to see the sky. It was great to have modern windows when we moved on to the senior school.
Can you remember "The Man from Uncle" in the 60s. I loved Ilya kuriakin ( probably spelt completely wrong...lol)

18 Feb, 2015

 

Played by David McCallum. Who is now 81. As for me, I liked to watch The Saint tv series who was played by Roger Moore...later to become James Bond. My all time favorite was a tv series called The Prisoner played by Patrick Mcgoohan. When another episode of that series came on everything that I was doing came to a stop.

18 Feb, 2015

 

The Saint was one of my favourites too,and I used to make that my staying in night :o) I could never really get into The Prisoner,but my parents liked it..I did love the filming of it at Portmeirion in Wales..and it was lovely to be able to visit a couple of times since..Apologies to our Welsh friends,if the spelling is incorrect..

19 Feb, 2015

 

For me Sean Connery will always be James Bond and Roger Moore the Saint.....

I watch NCIS on Sky and david mccallums dr mallard the autopsy guy, looks old but at times you see that cheeky grin....
he was always my favorite....

how about starsky and hutch....the original of course, and the professionals with bodey and doyle.....

19 Feb, 2015

 

I was never a big fan of James Bond films,Pam..and I did like Starskey and Hutch.,but the Professionals was a real favourite of mine..:o)

19 Feb, 2015

 

Here's a recollection that came to mind. A good friend of mine was in what was then known as the US Army Air Corps. He was stationed in Chelvestan UK during WW2 There was a heavy bomber base there. He told me that the locals there said that the US guys had " Hollywood Accents". I surmise that that description of the American accent came from watching American movies before having personal contact with these guys. During his time there almost one thousand men who took off from that airfield never returned and more than that came back wounded.

19 Feb, 2015

 

Oh dear! Loosestrife. Its so hard to imagine so many lives lost. Never, never again I pray.
My friend from Canada used to bristle a bit when people mistook her accent for an American. I used to remind her that I did too when we first met.

20 Feb, 2015

 

I loved Starsky and Hutch, preferring Starsky...
I think David mcCallum is still quite sexy. I know...I'm weird!!!
Bodie and Doyle, oh yes. Me and T used to watch that religiously. Did you ever see that programme called Soap? One ringydingy, two ringydingies. Lol That's where Goldie Horne started out I believe. Verrrrry interesting but stUpid!!
I could never get into The Prisoner but loved Starsky and Hutch. All the twenty something's wanted a Starsky and hutch stripe on their car. T used to spray them on for friends. It didn't seem to matter what make of car they had or what colour, they just wanted the stripe....

20 Feb, 2015

 

Thinking back to the meals we had back then, we used to have only what was in season. In winter, just the winter greens. Tunip or swede, stored carrots, sprouts.... Every child's nightmare...lol A treat of ham off the bone for Saturday tea and a tin of salmon on Sunday. We used to ask the butcher for the ham bone for the dog and I remember one time, there was so much ham left on the bone we shared it between our Aunty and us. What a treat mid week.. We had cooking an housekeeping lessons in school. All morning on Mondays as I remember. Mother used to get exasperated when I suddenly remembered I needed meat for the meal we were expected to cook that morning. A quick nip to the co-op butcher before catching the school bus was a too frequent thing back then. Mothers fault for forgetting to ask me what ingredients we needed for meal. Lol. Most people had a veg plot or allotment. My dad used to take me, sitting on a cushion that was tied to the crossbar of his bike, to an allotment shared by my grandad, to fetch anything that was ready. I loved the allotment. Especially the shed full of alsorts. Grandad sitting on the bench outside cutting up tobacco in the palm of his hand with a pocket knife. I found that so fascinating and I loved the smell of his pipe. When I was 10 I bought my dad a pipe for his birthday because I wanted him to smell and to be like grandad...lol. I used to get 6 pence spending money and I had saved up for months to get it.

20 Feb, 2015

 

Ohhh SOAP......so funny, ......'confused? you will be'

just googled it, the campbells and the tates, benson the butler, a wild parody of daytime soaps and so very funny as it was so daft.....thanks for the memories 😂

20 Feb, 2015

 

This is a lovely blog Homebird, just right for dark wet february days
thankyou 👵

20 Feb, 2015

 

We didn't have an allotment but used to buy our tomatoes from a man who did and the smell of the greenhouse is with me yet every time I smell a fresh tomato. Two ancient uncles had one too, by the side of a river. They had a shed with a real range, goodness knows how they got the coal to it as it was quite a way from the road and even then there was only a very infrequent bus service. Funny but I never wondered about that before. There was a toilet on the edge of the bank, with a long drop into the river. One of them grew wonderful sweet peas which he enjoyed giving away as much as we enjoyed receiving them!

20 Feb, 2015

 

This is such a lovely blog to read! So many memories and reminders... When Dad was away working abroad, as the eldest of three (eventually four) I had special privileges. Every Friday I was allowed to stay up with Mum and watch Dragnet, with Jack Webb ( "the names have been changed to protect the innocent" - "Guilty, more like" I used to think) and we always had Heinz tomato soup and cream crackers and cheese. It was such a treat.

I found out who Father Christmas really was when Mum asked me to help her sort out the gifts one Christmas Eve. Poor Mum honestly thought I already knew! I was perfectly happy once it was made clear I'd still wake up to my usual haul. How mercenary is that? 😛

21 Feb, 2015

 

Thats children for you Mel.....first things first!

heinz tomato soups comfort food isn't, reminds us of childhood....
odd to think its so old(I thought about 50 years)
....just googled it, imported to Britain in 1910!! So over 100 years ago....incredible.....

22 Feb, 2015

 

T just reminded me that it wasn't 'Soap' with the 'one ringydingy, two ringydingies' it was Rowan and Martins laugh in with Goldie Hawn and 'Sock it to me'. Confused? Yes I was....lol
I loved that silly programme nearly as much as Soap. Startrek with with Captain Kirk. My goodness wasn't that corny!! But I loved Spock.
I still love Heinz tomato soup. Even though my mother gave me that with dry toast nearly every day when I had the yellow jaundice. When I asked years later why I had to survive on mostly that, she said the doctor had told her I wasn't allowed anything with fat in it until the yellow faded and that was the only thing she could think of at the time that was warming and filling and didn't have any fat in...lol. It was a surprise to hear it's been around for over 100 yrs old. Even home made isn't as good as that.
Did you ever have 'pobs'? Toast soaked in hot milk. It was my mothers standby when any of us were unwell and off our food.

22 Feb, 2015

 

You bet your sweet bippy homebird. Live long and prosper. DARN! OUCH! I just pulled a ligament in my hand giving you the Vulcan Salute. What on earth does Bippy mean? Well, I'll " look it up in my Funk and Wagnalls."

22 Feb, 2015

 

I've always loved toast, from sitting under the table on a little stool at my grandparent with my slightly blackened efforts to lunch today....toast and heinz tomato soup real comfort food

'beam me some up Scotty'

I 'm more a Who'er though really......

22 Feb, 2015

 

Oh my,I had forgotten about 'Pobs',Sheila..Mercifully,I was never given those,but my mother often had them,but with untoasted bread .She said it settled her stomach,if she couldn't face other food..My Grandmother always used to hang half of an onion up in her kitchen,if any of her large brood had a cold..I believe that is still thought to do good,even now..Like others,I was given Fennings Fever cure..horrible stuff..and the Dr always gave you a bottle of tonic,to buck you up,when you were getting better..We always had Beechams powders in the house,at the first signs of a sniffle..

22 Feb, 2015

 

We still have Beecham's powders Sandra - moved house on them once when we both had flu - imagine moving house ans spending all next day in bed - goodness what our new neighbours thought...

22 Feb, 2015

 

Beecham's Powders were always my m-i-l's standby. I hated them! Then I found them in tablet form - much better (and definitely NOT the same thing as Beecham's Pills!). When we had upset stomachs, and were a bit older, we had Dr Collis Browne's. It used to have morphine in it. No wonder we found it soothing!

23 Feb, 2015

 

Anyone ever hear of Carter's Little Liver Pills?

23 Feb, 2015

 

Loosestrife, T says your bippy is probably something you sit on and he didn't mean the cushion. Lol. Carters little liver pills aren't the ones that turn your wee green are they? I once had a patient bring me a bottle of bright green wee to test and I was so surprised I took it to show the old Doctor I was attached too. He knew straight away what had caused the colour...lol.
Pam I had to be careful how I read ' Who'er'.....!!!!!!
I remember the Beechams powders. Disgusting taste...the tonic the doctor gave us wasn't too bad.
Poor Stera, moving house with the flu......I can just imagine what the neighbours were thinking...lol
I also remember Dr Collis Browns, Melchi, I used to think it was made by our Gp....Dr Collis....lol no wonder they sold loads. It's like Dinifords for babies. That was the one the midwives got addicted too. I must say, I loved the smell of that.
Oh! I just remembered that awful Sanizal toilet roll. We used to use it as tracing paper...lol

23 Feb, 2015

 

Carter's Little Liver Pills were touted to relieve just about everything with the exception of an hangnail. In the end( no pun intended) it was found to contain nothing more than a laxative .

24 Feb, 2015

 

Oh that was horrible paper Homebird...... I can't remember the collective name for Dr Who fans.....
David Tennant and Christopher Ecclstone raised the standard of the acting, saldly Matt Smith didn't although it coukd have been the writers as the plots were convoluted rubbish....high hopes of the new Doc.....

no one ever mentions Crossroads......mabe left dead and buried....

thankfully we didn't have carters liver pills!....green wee yuk!
I used to like the taste of the Collis Browne medicine.....did you know you can still buy it from the pharmacy .(just googled it)...with restrictions, it still contains morphine......gosh!

24 Feb, 2015

 

Oh,Crossroads,Pam !! It was so corny,but I still watched it ! I think it went the same way as Eldorado,but took much longer to die a death :o)
Anyone remember one of the first soaps? I think it was called The Grove Family..My favourite was Knotts Landing.on a Monday afternoon,a follow on from Dallas...but that was in the Eighties,I think..I know we had Video Recorders then,as I didn't want to miss an episode..

24 Feb, 2015

 

It was Bloomer!
the set used to wobble hadn't it......

Dallas was a must.....who shot JR...

24 Feb, 2015

 

I remember the Grove Family, Bloomer, and still recognise the lad in the family when he appears on TV now (Christopher Beeny). I also remember a children's TV programme called The Appleyards - I loved it :)

24 Feb, 2015

 

Ha Ha,I had forgotten about the wobbly set,Pam :o) I liked Dallas too..and Dynasty...those were the days :o)

I didn't know it was Christopher Beeney in the Grove family,Gee,I couldn't tell you what any of them looked like now..I don't think I watched the Appleyards ,as I would be at work ..I was 18 before we had a TV !
I can'r remember when daytime programmes started,as it seemed to be early evening and we had to wait for it to warm up ..:o)

24 Feb, 2015

 

I can't remember when we first had a TV although I remember going to a neighbour who was an invalid and she had all the children from the street in to watch children's TV each day, bless her. I do remember the whole of my family watching our first TV set for the whole evening, with lines buzzing across the screen, because no one was brave enough to try and sort it out!

24 Feb, 2015

 

I was about 5 when we had our first TV. (I was born in 1949) It had a tiny screen. I remember my Mum waking me from bed to see a circus. It must have been evening time and the TV must have arrived sometime that day.
I followed Dalas and Knotts Landing avidly. It was funny to listen to Terry Wogan the following morning discussing what had happened on the episode the night before. He nicknamed Charlene Tilton the poisonous dwarf and Sue Ellen-Swellin.

24 Feb, 2015

 

I seem to remember one of those fixed term Insurance policies being due to my parents at the time,in the days when the Insurance man used to call for the money every week,and marked it off in your book :o) That bought them the TV and mum's first Washing machine ,a top loader,with the Agitator and automatic wringer ,where we used to have to fold the sheets flat,and feed them through.We thought it was sheer luxury,which it was ,,compared to the way you had to heat the water in a boiler,and scrub the dirtiest clothing on a washboard,before bashing them with a Posser in the wash tub...and lifting them out with those long handled wooden tongs ! It then had to be emptied,and filled with cold water to rinse..It was a full mornings job,wasn't it ? Only flannelette sheets in those days too,and so heavy to lift out,to wring through the mangle ..How lucky we are ,when you look back..Wash day was always on a Monday at our house,so when you came home,it was all drying in front of the fire,if it wasn't fit to hang them out..
Our neighbours were the first ones to get a TV in our street,in 1953,in time for the Coronation..some of us were invited to watch,on a tiny screen,which was fitted inside a dark wooden cabinet with two opening doors..just magical to us..:o) 5 years later,we finally got one:o)

24 Feb, 2015

 

I remember the Groves, and The Appleyards, Gee - and Christopher Beeny. I remember Grandma Grove used to say " I'm faint for lack of nourishment " !

24 Feb, 2015

 

Lol.Sheila,I remember the Poisoned Dwarf,and Swellin.I didn't know it was Terry Wogan who started that..and wasn't one of the Actresses always referred to as Sweet pea? not sure if if was Dallas,or Knotts Landing,but she was married to Gary..then there was Miss Ellie :o) I liked the guy who was also the 'Man from Atlantis' ..Patrick somebody,I think..wasn't he supposedly bumped off,but came back ..obviously,still very much alive..!
I would love to see both these being shown again..I wonder what we would think of them now? maybe it would spoil the memory..
There was also another American soap,around that time,with Jane Wyman in it,and about her being the owner of a Vineyard?

24 Feb, 2015

 

Falcon Crest

25 Feb, 2015

 

A popular US soap opera that seemed to go on forever was " The Edge Of Night "

25 Feb, 2015

 

Don't know that one Loosestrife......
I was born in '52 and well remember.....in order
picture book
andy pandy
bill and ben
rag tag and bobtail
then on friday my favorite
the woodentops....and the biggest spotty do you ever did see.....
I googled it and theres a full episode....gosh...
and one of bill and ben too....
captain pugwash
torchy the battery boy
fireball XL5.......

wow a real nostalgia fest, incredible that they've been saved

by the way not many more to your golden trowel award......
we haven't had one of those awards for a long while xxx

25 Feb, 2015

 

Thanks for that,Loosestrife..that is the one..I haven't heard of The Edge of Night though.

25 Feb, 2015

 

I don't know The Groves but looked it up and apparently it ended just before we got our first TV set in 1957.
I liked Crossroads and can remember the bannister rail in reception wobbling all the time, lol, Noelle Gordon was a favourite of mine and I remember her introducing Lunchbox, Sue Nicholls from Corrie played a waitress
Marilyn I think and went on to marry the local vicar..
Patrick Duffy is the one you are thinking of Bloomer, we watched the new Dallas and he was in it as was Larry Hagman at first although he had to be written out as he passed away in real life, it was the same old storyline but with the next generation doing all the dirty deals and just went around in circles, not a patch on the original, JR's son was portrayed as being as evil as his dad but the actor couldn't pull it off in my opinion, they ended it in the middle as per usual and we did hear that it wasn't carrying on as didn't make the ratings.....

25 Feb, 2015

 

Ah yes,Patrick Duffy..thanks Sue....I didn't watch the new Dallas,but I agree ,it's not often they are as good as the Originals..I didn't realise Sue Nicholls was in Crossroads either..But do remember Benny,in that knitted hat..I think he passed away quite young didn't he? not certain,but it seems to ring a bell..which hopefully stirs up the grey matter a bit Lol

25 Feb, 2015

 

Loved your list of programmes, Pam. Rag, Tag and Bobtail was one of my favourites. Does anyone remember Prudence Kitten, or Mr Turnip with HL (Humphrey Lestocq) ? I think the programme was called Whirligig.

26 Feb, 2015

 

Well H.bird..I have been waiting to see if you were going to going to add the 100th comment on your blog..but thought it needed doing,so we could congratulate you on getting GoY's Golden Trowel award ! The first in 2015...
Well done, Sheila :o) Not about gardening,I know,but who cares? Lol it's passed a very dreary winter on very nicely..
Lets see if we can keep it going even longer..I'm sure we can still find lots of our memories to chat about...xx

26 Feb, 2015

 

I have been up at my daughters again, childminding for the last two days so I'm only just catching up. I am enjoying all this nostalgia....and having a laugh along the way. Won't be long now til we are busy in the gardens and won't find time for this trip down memory lane.
Bill and Ben, Andy Pandy, Rag Tagged Bobtail..they were such sweet programmes. I found Andy Pandy on Utube to show to my grandchildren. They weren't as impressed as I was..lol
I remember in the early 60s there being a craze at school of wearing long legged knickers with lace around the bottom. You were supposed to wear them showing just below the skirt hem. Does anyone else recall this fad or was our school the only one for nutters.
When did rationing finally end? I recall my Mother saying that she had to use a ration coupon when they bought my first pair of shoes. That would be about 1950. I had such tiny feet as I was walking at 8 and a half months, and I was small enough apparently to walk straight under the kitchen table, so they say, and needed shoes. My first memory was of catching snails and putting them in a house I made between our back door step and next doors. Then being upset when I looked next day to find them gone. I think they were meant to be my first pets...lol

26 Feb, 2015

 

I regret that I did not keep some sort of day to day written record of my early life, a diary I suppose. I remember some, but there have been alot of details that will never be recollected. I think I will suggest to my grandchildren that they do something like that. Just a few words on a page a day can bring up a good amount of memories years later.

26 Feb, 2015

 

Oh I remember those Hbird.......mine were bright turquoise if I remember right!.....
such a brightly coloured era, understandable I guess after the greyness of the war years.....
Miniskirts and hotpants.....psychedelic materials....Luminous green and pink socks....

congratulations winning your golden trowel......well deserved I'd say xxx

27 Feb, 2015

 

I remember the long knickers with lace, Hb - it was very fashionable! I think we called them long johns, except they weren't really. I had a pair which had black and white vertical stripes, like a humbug! Just as well I was just a kid - they must have looked like a clown's trousers!

Rationing didn't finally end until 1954, but it had been gradually lifted from 1948. It was right off my radar, and I don't remember anything about it, even though I was born in '47.

27 Feb, 2015

 

I remember Whirligig, Mr Turnip, etc too, Melchisedec. I believe Humphry Lestocq lived near here at Rye when we moved this way in 1970 but I never saw him! I loved Annette Mills sitting at the piano with Prudence kitten. In fact I have a black glove puppet which was bought for me (I was aged about 7 I think). It didn't look at all like the TV one but I loved it and it still sits in my bedroom :)

27 Feb, 2015

 

I remember that I started to keep a sort of diay - not of my daily doings, but of wider events that I thoguht might be interesting to look back on. All I can remember now is that there was a lot of grumbling when a large white loaf went up to 1/6 ...

And the Merry Christmas power cuts during the miners' strikes - (scheduled power cuts around the country to save power: mine was always on the night Star Trek was on TV!) , 3-day weeks, shops not allowed to have illuminated signs or windows (high streets became so gloomy), profiteers selling single candles for £1 each;

... a mid-terrace 3-bed council house selling for £800, the outcry when the price of a brand-new Mini Cooper nudged over £1,000 ...

Anyone remember Mr Pastry? or Hiram Holliday?

27 Feb, 2015

 

Speaking of Star Trek . Leonard Nimoy the actor who play Mr. Spock passed away today.

28 Feb, 2015

 

I can't remember Mr Turnip or whirligig. I loved the phsycedelic colours. Going straight from the mini to the maxi skirts. I really liked wearing those long floaty skirts and coat.
When we were looking to buy our first house in the early seventies they wouldn't take the wife's earnings into account for a mortgage. You couldn't borrow more than two and a half times the husbands yearly earnings. You could buy a whole shopping trolley of food for £5 from Quicksave. I suppose that was the start of the end of the village shops. T and I were counting how many shops there used to be in our village. Dozens. Now there is just a paper shop, a co op, a butcher, a bits and bobs shop and 3 hairdressers and a builders supply. There used to be 5 butchers, 5 grocers, 4 draperies, 2 habadasheries, 3 news paper shops, 2 chemists, 4 sweet shops, 3 fish shops, 7 pubs, a cinema, 4 hairdressers and 2 barbers. Plus the two brothers who sold fresh veg from their garden allotment.
I don't remember locking our back doors unless we went on holiday back then either. I remember putting the tea caddy onto the table at grandmas if she wasn't in when we visited to let her know we had called. It seems life was so much simpler then but I suppose I am looking back through rose coloured glasses...lol
Do you remember learning to tell the time? I think I was about 7. My lovely uncle taught me by the old grandmother clock at grandmas. It still ticks away on the wall in my hall, cocked to one side as it won't go if we straighten it up...lol

28 Feb, 2015

 

Homebird mentioned a new home, which made me think that life a while ago was like a garage in ones new home. Empty with just the bare essentials and enough room not only to park the car in but also a bit of "puttering around" space also to do whatever one liked to do. Then, as the years went by, this and that went into it, mostly stuff that was thought to be needed someday but never was until there was no room to park the car and no way to get into that puttering around area that was enjoyed so much. So much of life's junk was in there that just to look at it made one give up the thought to even attempt to straighten it out. Today " Life's Garage" is so full of gadgets and gizmos, rules and regulations, taxes and fees, fears and worries for some that they give up on any attempt to straighten out and empty the tangle so that they have enough time and space to truly do what they like to do for a while..... and maybe .....that is what is missed so much... and maybe...that is what is meant when one says that life was simpler.

28 Feb, 2015

 

Too much rushing about as you say......as gardeners we should remember to take time to smell the roses as they say 🌹

Oh Mr Pastry.......such fun real slapstick, the imsge in my mind is in black and white...
And how about crackerjack CRACKERJACK........

28 Feb, 2015

 

Mr Pastry, oh yes I liked him. Crackerjack was fun too. It was in that that they played double or drop wasn't it. I still say that when I am loading T up from the stuff in the boot of the car...sometimes there will be a cabbage too...lol

28 Feb, 2015

 

Crackerjack reminded me of Crackerjacks which was popcorn covered with caramel and peanuts. It came in a box and in every box there was a prize(toy). The toy could be a charm, a magnifying glass, a little compass etc. I blew a lot of change buying things in my youth to get those prizes. Also there were prizes in cereal boxes such as baking soda submarines and Cartesian divers. If there were no prizes in this junk food of my youth there were boxtops or coupons to save(such as in Bazooka Bubble Gum) and when I reached a certain number I could send them in to get a prize. Would like to know if you had the same thing in the UK?

28 Feb, 2015

 

Goodness I remember Hiram Holliday with his steel umbrella - wouldn't miss that programme! And I remember sweets coming off ration and going to the shop to buy some for the first time. A neighbour in the shop at he same time asked me how I liked buying sweets off ration and I remember saying "I don't know, I'll tell you in a minute" Can't remember what I bought though.

Nobody has mentioned air raid sirens - I can remember being woken in the night by them and being taken down to the Anderson shelter in the garden. My mother used to grow lettuce on top of it and there was an little old jar in there with a few boiled sweets in it. My dad was an ARP warden and couldn't come into the shelter, which used to worry me a lot. We kept the milk down there in hot weather. Later when the shelter was removed and there was what we used to call a heat wave my dad would buy a huge piece of ice and put it in the old dolly tub and the milk and butter would be arranged on top. I can't think how he gt it home because we didn't have a car and petrol was severely rationed anyway. Fridges? Something we heard the Americans had...

28 Feb, 2015

 

We had air raid drills (though we didn't know they were drills) in the US day and night. There were designated shelter places as indicated by signs or told what to do by air raid wardens. When the siren sounded we went off the street and into the shelters. At the sound of the siren or the whistle from the air raid warden at night it was all lights out and curtains drawn. If outside at night when a raid sounded I could see many clusters of searchlights which were turned on to scan the the night sky for enemy aircraft, it was frightening. I had a map on my bedroom wall that I used indicate the current positions of the allies during the war. In school we built small wooden models of enemy aircraft to be used as training and identification aids by those in the armed forces and got certificates of recognition in aiding the war effort for doing so. I still have some clippings of obituaries of those who died in the war who came from my home town, a gas ration stamp that my father gave to me after the war was over and even some war souvenirs which were given to me by relatives when they came back home. I might add that I was drafted and served in the Korean war. Being new to all this, it was all brought home to me real quick when I was standing on top of a tank to get a better view of a fight going on when someone told me that had better get the #€££> down because they were shooting at US!

28 Feb, 2015

 

I was lucky enough to be born in '52, after the war and all that went with it.....Mum always hated thunderstorms, I thought maybe they reminded her of the bombs.....

crackerjack was a lovely daft childrens game show......I think the cabbage was a booby prize.....crackerjsck pencils were prizes I think.....your edible ones sound nice.....

we collected cards I remember, was it brookebond tea? The one with the chimps.....
had to save the cereal boxes and loo rolls for blue peter.....plenty of sticky back plastic of course!

28 Feb, 2015

 

suddenly remembered the old telelphone boxes, for no reason that comes to mind! eery time we came to a phone box ew'd go in and press Button B, and often we'd "win" a penny when the last person to use the box forgot to press and get their money back.

I only heard an air raid siren once: in the 70s they were going to be used as flood warnings in the event of another tidal surge hitting the east coast and Thames estuary. One went off once, and the first thing I thought of was getting my books up off the floor as high as I could, to try to protect them. Luckily it was a false alarm.

1 Mar, 2015

 

I remember all sorts of plastic toys in cereal packets - the bicarb submarines and divers certainly figured! And we loved the cards from the tea. It was indeed Brooke Bond, and the albums were lovely, packed with information.

Mr Pastry was Richard Hearne, and Clive Dunn was Mr Crumble. He was much younger than anyone realised - only 48 when he started in Dad's Army! I used to love Crackerjack. I thought it was wonderful that the contestants in Double or Drop could actually keep everything they managed to hold on to! Once they had three cabbages, awarded for wrong answers, or dropping anything, they were out.

Does anyone remember the I-spy books? They were 6d each, but there were "specials" which were bigger and in colour. They cost 1/- . The first page was always a letter from Big Chief I-Spy.

1 Mar, 2015

 

I'd forgotten the toys in the cereals. There was a bubblegum with man from uncle cards that my friend and I used to buy with the bus fare I saved by getting off three stops before home. I remember choking on a sherbet dip. Inhaling the powder by accident. I've never bought one since...lol it really put me off them. My son bought me my favourite...a quarter of American cream soda...for Christmas. Complete with a strawberry flavoured lolly to dip. He'd bought it from a special old fashioned sweet shop. He bought my daughter a quarter of coconut tobacco. The Mardy bum wouldn't even let me have a bit, even though I let her dip her finger in mine.
My mother used to ring me from the phone box in the village square when I lived in the nurses home. Four old pennies and you could talk for ages.
Did anyone try making a trolley from old pram wheels? My brother did and you took your life in your hands when you had a go with it.
Loosestrife it must have been awful in Korea. Thank the Lord I've never had to experience war. T says his old friend was with the Gloucesters in Korea.
I can't remember the I spy books but T does. He remembers getting them as gifts from Chapel and took them on the bus when they went on the Sunday school trips.
Did you have a neighbour who read the tea leaves? We did and I thought she was magic. She told me I would receive a present soon and I was given a book from Sunday school the following Sunday. 😊

2 Mar, 2015

 

Yes, " The Glorious Glousters!"

2 Mar, 2015

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