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Stew using Water Hawthorne flowers (Aponogeton)

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I was intrigued by a recipe I found when I was looking for more information about the Water hawthorne I grow in my pond.

!Synonym

Aponogeton distachyum

Common Names: Waterblommetjie, Cape-pondweed, Water Hawthorn, Vleikos, Cape Pond Weed Origin……

Native to South Africa Western Cape and Mpumalanga Provinces but introduced elsewhere in quiet ponds in warm temperate to subtropical climates in winter rainfall areas. It grows in ponds and vleis which dry up in summer, becoming dormant in the dry summer and growing again when the pools fill with autumn rain.

Cultivation and uses

It is widely cultivated in South Africa for its edible buds and flowers, used in the recipe Waterblommetjiebredie.

Recipe for Waterblommetjie Bredie (stew)
The recipe below is adapted from Ina Paarman’s recipe for a superior stew.Waterblommetjies are usually available in the stores in the winter months. Only the flowers and buds are used. The quantities given below should be enough for 6 servings.

1 kg mutton (flank, shin or shoulder), cubed
2 T (30 ml) oil
1 T (15 ml) butter
1 t (5ml) seasoned salt, or salt, freshly ground black pepper and a pinch of sugar
2 onions, chopped
1 cup (250 ml) chicken stock or white wine or water
1 T (15 ml) vinegar (or lemon juice or a handful of sorrel/surings)
3 cloves of garlic, chopped (optional)
pinch of chilli powder or cayenne pepper (optional)
500 g waterblommetjies cleaned
2 potatoes, diced
2 T (30 ml) wine vinegar
Brown the meat in the oil/butter mixture in a big heavy-bottomed saucepan. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon and season with seasoned salt or salt, pepper and sugar. Saute the onions in the same saucepan. Add the stock, vinegar, garlic and chilli powder. Bring to the boil. Return the meat to the saucepan. Simmer very slowly until the meat is nearly done. Add the waterblommetjies, potatoes and vinegar. Simmer until the vegetables are done. Season to taste. Garnish with chopped parsley. Serve with rice.

Traditional recipes are simpler and omit the garlic and chilli. They include surings/local sorrel or lemon juice in the place of the wine and vinegar, used above to sharpen the flavour.

I will have a go at making this when we have a few more flowers open.

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Comments

 

I still want to try Fiddle heads...The unfurled tips of fern.

9 Jan, 2012

 

I am very hungry now ;)))))))))))))))))

9 Jan, 2012

 

Lol Paul marvelous how many plants we can eat, I was watch a program on how certain pansies, lavender can be eaten with in reciepes too, sound lovely but I would sooner the plant no washing up with that hehe.

9 Jan, 2012

 

It certainly sounds interesting, HB. I wonder what the buds taste like? 500g worth of buds is quite a few buds, I'd imagine, so you would have to like them!
Let us know if you try it out?

9 Jan, 2012

 

Lol Sixpence, very true.
Lol Paul.... when we have tried it I will let you know what it is like......if we survive the experience that is......
I didn't know you could eat fern tips Pim. I grow asparagus fern purely for the fronds to put in with flowers. Which fern do you mean?

9 Jan, 2012

 

That's what I am not sure about HB.. They sell them in tins in America.

9 Jan, 2012

 

Pim, I just googled Fiddle heads and they are full of omega and lots of other good things.

9 Jan, 2012

 

:o))))

9 Jan, 2012

 

I found this info ....The fiddleheads of certain ferns are eaten as a cooked leaf vegetable. The most popular of these are:
Bracken, Pteridium aquilinum, found worldwide
Ostrich fern, Matteuccia struthiopteris, found in northern regions worldwide, and the central/eastern part of North America
Cinnamon fern or buckhorn fern, Osmunda cinnamomea, found in the Eastern parts of North America
Royal fern, Osmunda regalis, found worldwide
Zenmai or flowering fern, Osmunda japonica, found in East Asia
Vegetable fern, Athyrium esculentum, found throughout Asia and Oceania

Fiddleheads' ornamental value makes them very expensive in the temperate regions where they are not abundant

9 Jan, 2012

 

I have them in my yard...But to eat them? I just imagine they taste of asparagus or peas..

9 Jan, 2012

 

it says that Ligualria leaves are good for arthritis

9 Jan, 2012

 

Only one way to find out ...........

9 Jan, 2012

 

Agreed HB....Paul you eat them first..!

9 Jan, 2012

 

Errrrrrh!!

9 Jan, 2012

 

sounds very interesting Hb..

9 Jan, 2012

 

We may all meet in the poison centre one day soon Sl.......

9 Jan, 2012

 

Lol :-))

9 Jan, 2012

 

You have to be very careful about bracken though - I know country people used to eat the new fronds but later on they become poisonous.

9 Jan, 2012

 

Fascinating blog, not very brave myself so will leave the tasting to you lot, lol...

9 Jan, 2012

 

Not brave enough to try most things Steragram, but def going to put a few of the water hawthorn in the stew.
Don't you fancy our new cuisine Linclass.... :o)

9 Jan, 2012

 

Have my first flowers in our tiny pond thanks to you, really delighted, not enough for a stew though, do they have a perfume because I could not get down far enough to smell them lol

11 Jan, 2012

 

I have eaten Hosta...Not worth bothering with.

11 Jan, 2012

 

They have a very sweet scent Dd. The scent is strongest in the early summer when the air is still and it's very noticeable. If you could reach one you could pick it and have a sniff....The flowers snap off easily.
Not tried Hosta Pim, I think the roots are edible aren't they?

12 Jan, 2012

 

Oh! I don't know about the roots, I will check up. The very young leaves are eaten whole, older leaves you can cut out the fleshy stem and blanche it...Honestly not worth it though...It's true merit is as a beautiful ornamental plant.

12 Jan, 2012

 

I do agree...... :o))

12 Jan, 2012

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