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FLINTSTONES

amy

By amy

20 comments


No not the animated American TV series about a working class stone age family …….. Flint has been used by humans to make stone tools for at least two million years. The conchoidal fracture of flint causes it to break into sharp-edged pieces. Early people recognized this property of flint and learned how to fashion it into knife blades, spear points, arrowheads, scrapers, axes, drills and other sharp tools using a method known as flintknapping. If these tools were broken or damaged in use they were often reshaped into smaller tools of similar function.

The value of flint for making sharp tools was discovered and utilized by Stone Age people in almost every early culture located where flint could easily be found. Their survival depended upon having a durable material that could be used to produce sharp tools.
The main areas for flint mining in Norfolk was at Grimes Graves .. you can visit the underground tunnels today ..

Large chunks of stone flint often lie just beneath the surface of farm land causing immense damage to agricultural machinery ,a few of these flints have found their way into out garden by kind farmers only to glad to get rid of them . they are actually a lot larger than they look you couldn’t pick them up , you will see some have Fossils of Sea Urchins ( Echinoid ) attached to them which proves we were once under sea in Norfolk .

Flint is a used to decorate houses / buildings the richer the owner the more decorative the patterns would be on the outer walls showing their wealth ..

Most of these Flints are placed in my Fernery also my gravel scree garden ..

Not my house its one I copied to show you the flint walls .

Sorry as you can see it was absolutely poring with rain when I took these photos so not the clearest ones …

Thank you for looking ..

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Comments

 

Most interesting. Thank you Amy. I have photographs I took in Patcham Sussex, where flint knapped houses are quite common. A flint knappper was a trade. I used to wonder how they were 'fixed' into the concrete rendering. If I did it they would fall out. !

7 Mar, 2016

 

Fascinating blog, Amy. Added to GoYpedia.

7 Mar, 2016

 

Very interesting blog,Amy. I do like the Sea Urchin flint and the pitted one with the mossy plants in the holes. Well done for braving the rain to take the photos, it has enhanced the blue, green and brown colours of some of them.

7 Mar, 2016

 

Wow now I am envious Amy, aren't they smashing , I agree with Siris, think stones, flint, slate and suchlike always look better when wet, we always admire the houses/cottages when travelling around Norfolk and have often wondered how it was done....
Very interesting blog Amy, thankyou....

7 Mar, 2016

 

You do have a lovely selection Amy, they are really beautiful, we have some wonderful brick and flint cottages in Hampshire, and we have always admired them, I like your circular one best and the one with all the little holes, a most interesting blog...

7 Mar, 2016

 

Lovely in the fernery Amy. Is flint your local stone, or did you pick them up elsewhere.

7 Mar, 2016

amy
Amy
 

Thank you everyone , Diane I have watched them making walls but like you I'm sure mine would fall out I believe its a bit like dry stone walling they fit to connect with each other , I've just realize I put one photo on twice the one which looks a little like a horses head with a carbuncle( sea urchin ) nose.. I agree the rain does bring out all the beautiful colours ... Karen these flint stones are very common round here it is a local flintstone ,on the coast they also use small round pebbles from the beach to decorate their house walls ... Dd I have seen your lovely flint cottages when we visit the New Forest ...

7 Mar, 2016

 

This was fascinating and you have wonderful collection. Our first home, after we were married was a brick and flint cottage in Berkshire which we rented. It was very pretty and was in a nice spot called Bix Bottom!!

7 Mar, 2016

 

A very interesting & informative blog, Amy! Thank you. :-))

Almost alongside us there is a big pub that when it was built, beginning of the 1960s, the outside walls are absolutely covered in flint stones cut open to show their interior to the world! I'd never seen so much flint before we moved up here from London in the mid 60s.

I know of no other building with such a huge amount of flint covering it. In the 50 odd years since the pub was first built I doubt if more than a few of the stones have ever fallen out of the walls! I've seen an occasional hollow but the stone has always been replaced again within a few weeks.

I don't go around photographing pubs so I don't have any photos of it but I do have some photos of the hanging baskets on the outside walls & there is some flint stone visible around the baskets. I'll have to look for them & upload a couple to my photos.

7 Mar, 2016

amy
Amy
 

It sounds idyllic Chris I love that name Bix Bottom it makes you smile :o))
We have a lot of flint properties in Norfolk Balcony the good thing is they have started to introduce it into more new buildings keeping the craft alive ... I'll look out for your photos , your pub reminds me of one at Brandon called the Flintnappers arms ...

7 Mar, 2016

 

Amazing how something so primitive is still very much in use today, and with many functions. I appreciate the back story too. Nice blog Amy.

8 Mar, 2016

 

Well well. I hadnt realised you are Norfolk! For some reason I had you in the West country! :)

8 Mar, 2016

 

What an interesting Blog Amy and what a wonderful collection of flint stones you have. I have also wondered how they managed to get the pieces of flint to adhere to walls in the past, but never come up with a satisfactory explanation. It's quite amazing how primitive man could achieve something which has got us stumped today.

8 Mar, 2016

 

Interesting, Amy, did you pick those stones intentiously or by accident? Anyway, I love natural stones among green in the garden.

8 Mar, 2016

 

Very interesting and you have some great flints in your own garden.they look good amongst Ferns, I think.

8 Mar, 2016

 

It's a very decorative stone and looks nice in your garden Amy. I've got a few bits I found somewhere.
I love the urchin - love fossils.

8 Mar, 2016

amy
Amy
 

Thanks Paul I'm glad you found it interesting ,we are deff. Norfolk East Anglia Karen :o)we picked them up intentionally kat as being natural stone to blend in the gravel/fern areas ... Thanks Paul , Hywel I like the fossils it brings it home to you the age of our island I look at them and try to imagine what it was like covered in water ....

9 Mar, 2016

 

Appreciate your blog Amy. Thank you.

10 Mar, 2016

 

Pardon my jingoism by adding that we Americans won our independence with flint.

13 Mar, 2016

amy
Amy
 

Your welcome Klahanie , well done L/strife and good to know we are all good friends now :o)

13 Mar, 2016

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