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Dutch Elm

amy

By amy

7 comments


When we first moved here there was a dead Elm tree in the hedge , We cut it down , sometime after a sucker appeared at the base of it and is now about 4ft. tall ,it is very spinderly but is green and healthy , i,m not sure that it will ever grow into a strong healthy tree .
should I try to dig it up taking it away from the old roots and plant it somewhere else or leave well alone to see what happens .

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Comments

 

I tihnk I read somewhere that it usually takes 20 years for elms to succumb to Dutch elm disease so your sucker may have a limited lifespan anyway

11 Jun, 2008

 

Yes, Andrew, quite true. We had small dead Elm trees near our gate when we came - they are now logs for the logburner - but they had new growth near them and our tree surgeon told us that they will grow up to about 10 feet tall and then succumb to the Elm beetle - of course, they then die too.

11 Jun, 2008

amy
Amy
 

wow , Thanks for that information I really thought I was saving one for the future ,
looks as if it will have to come out , i,m afraid it will never be big enough for the log burner .but we do have some jolly big bonfires .

11 Jun, 2008

 

It's not just the beetle but the fungus that it feeds on... and that fungus is present in the rotting roots...maybe you could move it and cross your fingers.. Dutch Elm (which is really from China) went through Ontario back in the 50's and 60's proud to say that we are seeing full grown trees again...

12 Jun, 2008

 

Lori, the beetles fly to the next Elm, unfortunately. We don't have any large Elm trees in the UK as far as I know? (bet someone in a far corner of the country says they do!!! lol) I am glad that they are thriving with you. Beautiful trees. Now there's a threat to Oaks, Horse Chestnuts having suffered last year...

12 Jun, 2008

Sid
Sid
 

In fact Elms are still quite common in the British countryside, but they never get above a certain size before they are killed by the disease - you often see them in hedgerows for example. It's a pity really - if ALL the elms were completely killed, then the beetle would die out and elms could be reintroduced. I remember reading somewhere that it's the diametre of the trunk which is the ruling factor of when the tree will succumb.

13 Jun, 2008

 

check out the University of Guelph...Dutch Elm Study.

13 Jun, 2008

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